Albert Einstein's brain will go on display for the first time at an exhibition in London.

The Wellcome Collection in London will display part of the scientist's brain alongside that of Charles Babbage and two murderers William Burke and Edward Rulloff at the Mind as Matter exhibition.

After his death in 1955, Einstein's brain was divided into sections. Two sections will be featured at the Wellcome display.

"This single fragile organ has become the object of modern society's most profound hope, fears and beliefs - and some of the most extreme practices and advanced technologies," Marius Kwint, the show's co-curator, told Reuters.

"The different ways in which we have treated and represented real physical brains open up a lot of questions about our collective minds," he added.

Primitve brain surgery tools will also go on display including a trephine with a wooden handle and shark tooth blade for cutting through the skull.

The exhibition also features a 5,000-year-old skull with holes drilled through it, which shows how long humans have been performing brain surgery.

The exhibition runs from 29 March-17 June.

Researchers at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) have confirmed Einstein’s theory that neutrinos obey the limits of the speed of light.Reuters
A specimen of Nobel physicist Albert Einstein's brain is seen in a glass slide at an exhibition at the Wellcome Collection in London March 27, 2012.Reuters/Chris Helgren
Diseased brains mounted in acrylic are seen at an exhibition at the Wellcome Collection in London March 27, 2012.Reuters/Chris Helgren
An anatomical model of a human head is seen at an exhibition at the Wellcome Collection in London March 27, 2012.Reuters/Chris Helgren
A brain surgeon's tool from 1941 based on an 1803 design by surgeon William HeyReuters/Chris Helgren
A laser-etched lead crystal glass artwork by Katherine Dowson entitled Memory of a Brain Malformation is seen at an exhibition at the Wellcome Collection in London March 27, 2012.Reuters/Chris Helgren
A human skull with evidence of brain surgery is seen at an exhibition at the Wellcome Collection in London March 27, 2012.Reuters/Chris Helgren
Electric cable attached to gauge measures brain responsesReuters/Chris Helgren