Panda Security Quash Anonymous Hackers' Claims
Image Credit: PandaLabs

Following Anonymous hackers' alleged "punishment", PandaLabs has issued a statement clarifying it's security software has not been compromised.

The news stemmed from a statement published on Panda's Facebook page that clarified the situation. While Anonymous members had managed to deface several of Panda's sites, they had not found backdoors in the company's security software.

Moving on, the company reported that the web server compromised during the cyber raid was outside Panda's internal network, meaning no customer data has been put at risk.

"On March 6th the hacking group LulzSec, part of Anonymous, obtained access to a Panda Security web server hosted outside of the Panda Security internal network. This server was used only for marketing campaigns and to host some of the company's blogs. Neither the main website www.pandasecurity.com nor www.cloudantivirus.com were affected in the attack," read Panda's statement.

"The attack did not breach Panda Security's internal network and neither source code, update servers nor customer data was accessed. The only information accessed was related to marketing campaigns such as landing pages and some obsolete credentials, including supposed credentials for employees that have not been working at Panda for over five years."

Adding to this, Sophos analysts Graham Cluley later reported that Luis Corrons, technical director at PandaLabs, had confirmed to him that the security software was 100 percent secure.

The attack was allegedly done to "punish" Panda for comments made by Corrons in a blog post about AnonymouSabu's "snitching".

The attack saw the hackers deface an alleged 25 pandasecurity.com sub-domains, replacing their front pages with a message from Anonymois and YouTube video showcasing Anonymous and LulzSec's 2011 activities.

"Yeah Yeah we know... Sabu snitched on us as usually happens. FBI menaced him to his sons away. We understand, but we were your family too (remember what you liked to say?) It's sad and we can't imagine how it feels having to look at the mirror each morning and see there the guy who shopped their friends to the police. Anyway...." read Anonymous's statement.

Following the attack, security experts have questioned the motivation of the assault and voiced support for Corrons's sentiment: "Lads [Anonymous] defending freedom of speech until they don't like what you say."

"Many will feel sympathy with Panda Security today - all they did was comment on the news reports surrounding Sabu and LulzSec. They didn't deserve to be hacked like this. Thank goodness it wasn't that serious, and the company will be not be damaged long term by this incident," Cluley later added in his own blog post.