Apple event invite 21 March
Apple has sent out a press event invite for the release of its new iPhone, iPad models with a 'let us loop you in' messageScreenshot

Apple has sent out press event invites for what is believed to be the launch of its new iPhone and iPad models on 21 March. A message on the invitation reads: 'Let us loop you in'. The event is scheduled to be held at the Silicon Valley in California.

According to speculation, the new iPhone, dubbed the iPhone 5se, is expected to boost an upgraded version of the four-inch small-screen that was seen in the iPhone 5s. Meanwhile, iPhone 7 is rumoured to have a dual camera with two separate lenses to allow for two photos or videos to be captured simultaneously, however there has been no official confirmation from Apple.

Meanwhile, the new iPad is rumoured to have a screen little less than 10 inches diagonally and is expected to have added functionality for businesses with possibly a keyboard and stylus features. If reports are accurate, the new iPad Air will incorporate an A9X processor with at least 2GB RAM, as well as a rear-facing LED flash and extra speaker grills for better sound quality.

Apple has also teamed up with IBM to allow for the design of more apps that can be used by professionals in the new iPad. Microsoft has also created new versions of its software that can be run on the latest Apple tablet. New bands of Apple Watch are also expected to be featured at the 21 March event. Apple Watch 2 is believed to have only a minor update – an added FaceTime functionality.

According to Juniper research, Apple dominated over half of the smartwatch market since its release. Apple Watch accounted for 52% of global shipments while its major rival, Android Wear, accounted for only 10% in 2015. "The smartwatch is now a category waiting for a market. Newer devices have offered more polished looks and subtly different functions, but no large changes in device capabilities or usage. With smartwatch functions established, it is now up to consumers to decide if they want them, rather than technology companies providing more reasons," said James Moar, the Juniper research author.