Apple's Siri can beatbox
Apple's CEO Tim Cook talks about Siri in an Apple event in San Francisco CaliforniaReuters

Apple's Siri has been recently discovered to be able to beatbox. The virtual assistant seems to have hitherto unknown musical skills and has caused quite a stir on the internet. Fun fact: Siri can beatbox in different accents.

Siri is known for her quirky humour and droll comebacks. But that's not all that she can do. iOS users have recently discovered that when asked to beatbox, Siri shows off her mad skills by dropping a beat that goes "boots and cats". Thrilling isn't it?

The programmed "boots and cats" is played on a loop and refers to the phrase that people most commonly use when first learning to beatbox. Siri, clearly in the beginner phase of her sure-to-be-sensational hip-hop career, has so far mastered the "boots and cats" bit. However, more complex combinations of words and beats seem to be out of her grasp at the moment.

Siri's beatboxing abilities, although recently discovered (no, I didn't come across it sitting in my cubicle, fiddling with my phone. It was painstakingly researched), has been lying dormant for a while now. One of the most popular beatboxers on the web, Daichi, uploaded a video clip in December 2015 that showed Siri beatboxing in Japanese.

Impressively enough, with a change in language settings, Siri's beatboxing rhythm and tone alters as well. Unlike the English speaking version, in Japanese, Siri spouts the beats in a faster and more heart-pumping beat. Australian Siri keeps pace with its Japanese sibling as well, in terms of speed and tempo. American and British Siris in comparison took a more leisurely approach to dropping a beat (what's the rush, yo?)

Aspiring DJs may just be able to use Siri's newfound beatboxing skills to good use by connecting iPhones together to create a mix of sounds that can be found on Apple's music library. Excuse me, while I go ask Siri to play me something that helps me get my groove back.