The final poppy was planted in the moat of the Tower of London at 11am on Armistice Day. The 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' art installation is comprised of 888,246 ceramic poppies, each representing a British or Commonwealth military fatality during the First World War.

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Harry Hayes, aged 13, from the Reading Blue Coat School Combined Cadet Force, plants the final poppy at the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of WWI, in the moat of the Tower of LondonJustin Tallis/AFP
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Left: Sir Richard Dannatt salutes during the placing of the last ceramic poppy in the moat. Right: Military cadet, Harry Hayes, places the last poppyPeter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
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Crowds watch as preparations are made to plant the final poppy during a gun salute on Armistice DayKevin Coombs/Reuters
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Pearly Kings look at the field of ceramic poppies on Armistice Day at the Tower of LondonKevin Coombs/Reuters
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A yeoman stands in the field of poppies as crowds wait for the final one to be planted on Armistice DayNeil Hall/Reuters

The temporary installation has generated intense interest, with thousands lining up daily to look at the field of poppies since its planting began in August.

Organisers estimate four million people have visited the display.

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Visitors view the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation at the Tower of London by nightDan Kitwood/Getty Images
tower of london poppies
Crowds flock to view the installation in the moat of the Tower of LondonPeter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
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Visitors photograph the installation as it is illuminated at nightNeil Hall/Reuters
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Crosses are silhouetted against the illuminated field of poppiesNeil Hall/Reuters
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A photograph of Corporal Thomas William Belton of the Kings Shropshire Light Infantry, who died in Belgium in World War One at the age of 25, is placed on railings surrounding the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation in the moat of the Tower of LondonPeter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
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A traditional cross of remembrance is placed on railings surrounding the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation in the moat of the Tower of LondonPeter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
tower of london poppies
A Yeoman Warder holds ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British or Commonwealth military fatality in the First World WarAndrew Cowie/AFP

The poppies are due to be removed, starting on Wednesday 12 November, and sent to people who have bought them in return for donations to military charities.

Parts of the display, including a "wave" of poppies rising beside an entrance to the centuries-old Tower, will remain until the end of the month before going on a national tour. They eventually will be preserved in the Imperial War Museum.