Gerard Pique - FC Barcelona
Pique has rebuffed suggestions he is preparing to leave BarcelonaDavid Ramos/Getty Images

Barcelona defender Gerard Pique has handed former club Manchester United a major blow in their hopes of re-signing the World Cup winning centre-back in the immediate future.

Pique hasn't played for the Barca since the 3-1 El Clasico defeat to Real Madrid last month, missing the games against Celta Vigo, Ajax and Almeria prior to the international break, leading to questions regarding his future at the Nou Camp club.

The Spanish international's current deal with Barca doesn't expire until 2019 and, despite being currently out of favour under Luis Enrique, the player has no plans to leave for Chelsea or United, as has been reported.

"I think not to play two or three matches (and then leave) would not be consistent," he told Movistar TV. "Barcelona is my life and I do not plan to leave. I will continue to fight for a place.

"It's a player-coach relationship, he is the one who decides and players try to do what he wants from us."

The news is a further blow to United boss Louis van Gaal, who was expected to delve into the transfer market in January in order to improve the club's defence, which has been their weak link during the first three months of the season.

United have been beset with a crippling injury crisis, which has seen Phil Jones, Chris Smalling, Rafael, Marcos Rojo, Luke Shaw, Jonny Evans, Tyler Blackett and Paddy McNair all spend time on the sidelines.

Michael Carrick and Antonio Valencia have been employed out of position at times this season such has been their injury plight, while Van Gaal has used the club's academy in order to supplement his squad.

Pique's plans to remain at Barcelona follow reports that Borussia Dortmund have slapped a £47m valuation on captain Mats Hummels in order to warn off interest in the Germany centre-back.

Hummels has consistently been linked with a move to Old Trafford but remains committed to Jurgen Klopp's side, and the Bundesliga club's bold valuation is expected to deter interest from Europe's elite.