Alicia Ann Lynch, dressed up as a Boston Marathon bombing victim, to her office Halloween party. Here, a runner in a wheelchair is taken from a triage tent after explosions went off at the 117th Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts April 15, 2013. (Reuters)
Alicia Ann Lynch, dressed up as a Boston Marathon bombing victim, to her office Halloween party. Here, a runner in a wheelchair is taken from a triage tent after explosions went off at the 117th Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts April 15, 2013. (Reuters)

A Michigan women posted a picture of her Boston Marathon victim Halloween costume to Twitter, sparking outrage across the social media as the image went viral.

The woman, identified as 22-year-old Alicia Ann Lynch, dressed up as a Boston Marathon bombing victim to her office Halloween party. She wore a blue marathon shirt marked 739, and then put some fake blood and wounds on her head, arms, and legs.

"And the most offensive costume at work goes to...#toosoon?" she tweeted.

Lynch was soon blasted by thousands of users for her choice of outfit.

Sydney Corcoran, a real victim of the tragic incident, posted: "@SomeSKANKinMI You should be ashamed, my mother lost both her legs and I almost died in the marathon. You need a filter."

Other Twitter users bashed her for tasteless costume idea.

Rebecca Brown (@Chinchillazllla): "@SomeSKANKinMI People at the Boston Marathon died in terror and agony... and you looked at the images and thought "lol funny costume idea"?"

LisainDallas (@LisainDallas): @mzbilly @mmurphycit @SomeSKANKinMI Wow. If she has kids, would she put them in bloodied Sandy Hook shirts?

Josh Duhamel (@Jduham): "Is that chick with the marathon bombing halloween costume dead yet? have we killed her yet? If we havent, then what are we waiting for?"

Things took a turn for worse for Lynch, when users found out that she had posted her driver's license online. According to BuzzFeed, some contacted her family members and others circulated nude pictures and videos that she had on Tumblr. Lynch closed all of her social media accounts and contacted Buzzfeed, which originally reported the story, to apologise for her actions.

"It seems as though my outfit was too soon, and will always be that way, it was wrong of me and very distasteful," she wrote, "My costume was not meant to disrespect anyone, ever. I am truly sorry to anyone that I may have offended or hurt with this. I know my apology doesn't ever fix anything that has been done, but at least know that I am being sincere.

"I can't undo my actions or make up for them, but my apology is a start. I myself have been through tragic events, I just handle mine differently because that is how I was taught to. I realize I was in the wrong with this and again, I am truly sorry.

"I wore a costume to work, with people that know me, and wouldn't get offended by it. I had even ran the idea by a friend whom had his father in the marathon and he didn't have an issue with it. What I did may have been wrong, but is it truly right to wish harm upon someone and say that you're doing it for the victims? As being a part of a tragic event I never would ever wish what had happened to me upon someone else, as I can say most people wouldn't wish death upon someone to 'make it right'," she concluded.