YouGov Poll: 26% of respondents said that they would vote for the Ukip, led by Nigel Farage, while the Tories lag behind at 23%. The UK's main opposition Labour led the survey on 32%.
YouGov Poll: 26% of respondents said that they would vote for the Ukip, led by Nigel Farage, while the Tories lag behind at 23%. The UK's main opposition Labour led the survey on 32%.Reuters

Speculation that Britain is closer to exiting the European Union is heating up after a new YouGov survey revealed that the anti-EU and anti-immigration UK Independence Party, is set to beat David Cameron's Conservative party in an election to the European Parliament.

According to the survey, 26% of respondents said that they would vote for the Ukip, led by Nigel Farage, while the Tories lag behind at 23%. The UK's main opposition Labour led the survey on 32%.

Meanwhile, a number of other polls have shown that Britain is becoming increasingly concerned over the power Brussels has over the country and the "open door" immigration policy it imposes on members, which has led to a number of Conservative voters turning to Ukip.

In the last European Parliament poll in 2009, Ukip followed the Tories in second place with 17%.

However, YouGov added that the voting intentions would be significantly different when it came to a UK general election in 2015.

It said that 39% of the vote would go to Labour, Conservatives would fall behind in second place by six points, while Ukip would only claim 12% of the electorate.

On 15 January, UK Chancellor George Osborne warned the EU that if Brussels did not reform and relinquish stringent power over its members, then it is likely that Britain will vote to leave the 28-nation bloc.

"There's a very real risk that badly thought through EU laws will be imposed on the UK and will damage the City of London," said Osborne in a speech.

"This would be bad for the whole of Europe."

"Our determination is clear: to deliver the reform and then let the people decide.

"It is the status quo which condemns the people of Europe to an ongoing economic crisis and continuing decline. And so there is a simple choice for Europe: reform or decline."

He added that "non-Euro states need their rights legally protected if countries like Britain are to remain in the EU."

"EU treaties are not fit for purpose and [Britain] doesn't want the UK to be forced to choose between joining the euro and leaving the EU."