There has been a low turnout in the first contested Burundi elections, with only 12 people voting at the London embassy out of 86 registered to vote on Monday 29 June.

Burundi embassy London
A dozen protesters stood outside the Burundian embassy located in Uganda House in London on Monday 29 JuneIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
A protester holds a sign calling for the boycott of the elections outside the Burundian embassy in London on 29 JuneIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
A protester calls on voters to boycott the legislative elections outside the Burundian embassy in London on Monday 29 JuneIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
A protester stands outside the Burundian embassy in London as five voters turned up to vote on 29 JuneIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
Only five voters turned up to the Burundian embassy in London as opposition leaders called for people to boycott the elections on Monday 29 JuneIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
Members of the electoral commission (CENI) oversee the polling station at the Burundian embassy in London had 86 voters registered but remained almost emptyIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
Jean Armel Kiburugutu, a voter, awaits to be let in the polling station at the Burundian embassy in LondonIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
A young man awaits to cast his vote at the Burundian embassy in London on Monday 29 JuneIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
A paper ballot for the legislative elections in Burundi is handed to a voter at the Burundi embassy in London on Monday 29 JuneIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan
Burundi embassy London
A protester checks Twitter to read about the latest news coming out of Burundi as she boycotts the elections on 29 June at the Burundian embassy in LondonIBTimes UK/ Elsa Buchanan

The embattled legislative and municipal elections came only three days after UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called on the Burundian authorities to postpone the scheduled elections due to the political and security climate in the country.

Around a dozen Burundians, all UK-residents, stood outside Uganda House, home of the Burundian embassy, to call for voters to either boycott the elections or change their vote.

Only five voters turned up to vote - the other seven being members of the embassy and the electoral commission (CENI) - and the polls remained empty for most of the day.

Ghilain Mahoro, a London-based protester who boycotted the polls, told IBTimes UK: "We're here in London to protest against the illegal vote that are going on in Burundi."

He added: "The whole international community has spoken against these illegal elections, people are dying at the moment and all they (members of the ruling party) think about now if organising elections that have not been agreed upon by all parties. So we are here in order to proclaim and reclaim democracy in Burundi."

Jean-Armel Kiburugutu, a 28-year-old voter, explained he had been mis-informed about the elections, and blamed a lack of communication from the Burundian embassy. The young man added he had been told by the opposition that the elections in London "had been cancelled".

"I'm coming to exercise my right as a Burundian citizen to vote for a candidate. I was alone inside the polling station. I met the people who organise the elections, but I was the only one voting."

There are around 3,000 Burundians living in London, and 6,000 living in the UK.

It is estimated that more than 80 people have died and about 150,000 civilians have sought refuge in neighbouring countries since the start of the violence on 26 April, when the CNDD-FDD nominated Nkurunziza to stand for re-election. The controversial presidential elections are now planned for 15 July.

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