On their way to the forecourt, a man with a classic Maradona hair-do and an Argentina football shirt can clearly be seen mopping the floors.
On their way to the forecourt, a man with a classic Maradona hair-do and an Argentina football shirt can clearly be seen mopping the floors.

A two-second clip of a Diego Maradona look-a-like cleaning floors in a Carlsberg advert has sparked outrage in Argentina.

Argentinians on the social networks are calling for people to boycott 'England's official beer', in protest.

They see it as a cheap retaliation to the advert which saw an Argentinian hockey player, Fernando Zylberberg, training on a British war memorial for the London 2012 Olympic Games. The Argentine government ignored calls for the advert to be pulled and used it repeatedly in primetime slots.

In the advert, three eager football fans are taken on a tour of a fictitious England fan training school by Des Lynam.

Greeting them, Lynam says: "Ah gentlemen, welcome to the academy, where some of England's most promising fans learn to be great fans."

The former Match of the Day presenter takes the trio to various rooms where England followers are training to be the best fans they can.

Brian Blessed can be seen teaching a roomful of people to chant songs louder and Linford Chrisie is in another showing fans how to run in and out of the gents at speed during half time.

Ian Wright gives lessons on passion and how to celebrate whilst Ray Mears teaches fans how to endure poor weather conditions.

On their way to the forecourt, a man with a classic Maradona hair-do and an Argentina football shirt can clearly be seen mopping the floors at around one minute and five seconds in.

The patriotic advert then shows a graduation ceremony held by England legends Bobby Charlton and Peter Shilton.

One England fan took to Twitter to further rub salt into the Hand of God wound: "Carlsberg have upset the Argies, with their Maradona cleaning for England fans ad .......can't think why? he was always good with his hands," he said.

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