Margaret Thatcher
Online campaign sends Judy Garland's version of Ding Dong the Witch Is Dead to top spot following Margaret Thatcher's death.

Ding Dong The Witch is Dead has reached number one on the iTunes chart just three days after Margaret Thatcher's death.

Judy Garland's version of the song, which features in the 1939 musical The Wizard of Oz, rocketed to the top spot following a Facebook campaign set up by critics of the former British prime minister.

The Facebook group, urging people to download the track to get it to number one, already has more than 2,500 members.

Those cheering Thatcher's passing have prompted a download surge for the track, which saw the song enter the official UK chart at number 10 within 48 hours of the Iron Lady's death.

Ding Dong The Witch is Dead is sung by Dorothy, played by Garland, the Munchkins and Glinda the Good Witch, in Victor Fleming's American fantasy adventure film.

They belt out the track to celebrate the death of the Wicked Witch of the East after Dorothy "dropped a house on her".

BBC's Radio 1 is yet to decide whether it will play Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead if it makes the Top 40 in Sunday's Official Chart Show countdown.

"The Official Chart Show on Sunday is a historical and factual account of what the British public has been buying and we will make a decision about playing it when the final chart positions are clear," a spokesperson said.

One commentator said: "They should play the song. People voted with their money, in the purest spirit of free market [a principle espoused by Thatcher]. This should be respected."

Thatcher, known for her tough leadership style, died at the Ritz hotel after suffering a stroke. She was aged 87.

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