The Ebola outbreak has killed more than 3,800 people, according to the latest World Health Organisation figures.

The vast majority of those deaths have been in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

But it is Liberia that has been hit the hardest, recording more than 2,200 deaths.

Getty Images photographer John Moore is in Liberia, documenting the toll that the disease is taking on the West African country.

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A Liberian Red Cross burial team prays before collecting the body of an Ebola victim from his home near MonroviaJohn Moore/Getty Images
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The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 3,800 people since JanuaryJohn Moore/Getty Images
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A one-room home near Monrovia stands empty after a burial team collected the body of an Ebola victim for cremationJohn Moore/Getty Images
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A gravedigger works in a cemetery outside an Ebola treatment centre near Gbarnga, in Bong County, central LiberiaJohn Moore/Getty Images
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A handwritten headstone is seen at the grave of an Ebola victim outside a treatment centre near GbarngaJohn Moore/Getty Images

Global experts have issued stark warnings of the scale of West Africa's Ebola outbreak, with the US government estimating between 550,000 and 1.4 million people might be infected in the region by January. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said its projection was based on data from late August and did not take into account the US mission to fight the disease, so the upper end of the forecast was unlikely.

However, it followed research by experts from the World Health Organisation (WHO) and Imperial College, which estimated that 20,000 people risked infection within six weeks - months earlier than previous forecasts. It warned that the disease might become a permanent feature of life in West Africa.

Outbreaks in Nigeria and Senegal appear for now to have been contained. But nations across the region fear contagion and, against expert advice, have shuttered borders and restricted travel, complicating international efforts to fight the disease.

Antonio Vigilante, head of the UN Development Programme in Liberia, said Liberia had 350 to 400 beds for Ebola patients, but that fell far short of the 2,000 needed.

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US Marines arrive on MV-22 Ospreys to support the American effort to contain the Ebola epidemic. The four Ospreys, which can land vertically like helicopters, will transport US troops as they build 17 Ebola treatment centres around Liberia. President Barack Obama has committed up to 4,000 troops for West Africa to help combat the diseaseJohn Moore/Getty Images
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American Marines arrive in West Africa to take part in Operation United AssistanceJohn Moore/Getty Images
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An American soldier carries his kit after arriving in Monrovia to take part in Operation United AssistanceJohn Moore/Getty Images
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A health worker takes the temperature of US Marines arriving in Liberia to support the American effort to contain the Ebola epidemicJohn Moore/Getty Images
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US Air Force personnel put up tents to house a 25-bed US-built hospital for sick Liberian health workersJohn Moore/Getty Images
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Airmen from the 633rd Medical Group of the US Air Force set up tents for a 25-bed hospitalJohn Moore/Getty Images
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US Air Force personnel disinfect their hands after a day of setting up a 25-bed hospitalJohn Moore/Getty Images

US military planes have arrived in the Ebola "hot zone" with more Marines to help Liberia in its desperate attempt to control the disease. The US military is working to build medical centres in Liberia and may send up to 4,000 soldiers to help with the Ebola crisis. Medical workers and beds for Ebola patients are sorely lacking.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said the UK would provide more than 750 troops to help build treatment centres and an Ebola "training academy" in Sierra Leone. Army medics and helicopters will provide direct support. Britain will also contribute an aviation support ship.

British troops are expected to arrive next week in Sierra Leone, where they will join military engineers and planners who have been there for nearly a month helping to construct medical centres.

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US Navy microbiologist Lt Jimmy Regeimbal prepares to test blood samples for Ebola at a mobile laboratory in central LiberiaJohn Moore/Getty Images
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A sign reading 'Seal Team Nerd' hangs on the wall at the US Navy mobile laboratory near Gbarnga...John Moore/Getty Images
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...as well as an Ebola virus stuffed toyJohn Moore/Getty Images