UK riots
All those convicted of taking part in the riots from of looting or public order offences will be banned from shops in Manchester city centre for two years.

Danny Cook, 22, set up the Facebook page to take advantage of the social unrest that dominated the country for three days during August earlier this year.

Those convicted of crimes in relation to the summer riots continue to receive the most severe sentences for their actions and Cook was jailed for two and a half years for setting up the Facebook page: "Letz Start the Riots".

Cook set up the page trying to take advantage of the social unrest that dominated the country for three days during August earlier this year.

But West Mercia Police intercepted the page and promptly arrested Cook who later pleaded guilty to "intentionally encouraging or assisting in the commission of theft or criminal damage."

In a statement issued after sentencing, the West Mercia force said the Facebook page came to officers' attention during rioting in some UK cities in August.

A 16-year-old youth has already received a non-custodial sentence for comments he posted on the site, which was reported to the police by a member of the public.

Police inquiries established that Cook had also put his own comments on the Facebook page, including one which read: "The riotz are goin on from Brum to London tell you what I don't want to sit back cause I wanna join them."

Commenting on the offence, Superintendent Steve Cullen said: "At a time when tensions were running so high Cook's actions were extremely foolish and irresponsible.

"He has now paid the price for that by losing his liberty.

"What was seen in some of our cities in August was shocking and despite social media being used to try to incite violence and disorder here, thankfully we did not experience that in West Mercia."

The senior officer added: "We are grateful to those people who did contact us at the time with concerns over content on social media sites as although we do monitor them ourselves, information from the public is crucial.

"This was a serious crime and the sentence reflects that.

"We hope this case serves as a deterrent to anyone else who might be tempted to incite disorder in this way, regardless of the motive."