David Moyes
Real Sociedad have improved rapidly since David Moyes took charge.Getty

As if it was a deodorant motto, "the Moyes effect" has spread through San Sebastian and it seems to be lasting longer than 24 hours. Real Sociedad's win against Barcelona on Sunday reaffirmed the atmosphere surrounding the Scottish manager. It may sound strange in the UK, as he is the focus of loads of jokes in british football websites, but his appointment has brought euphoria and relief to Basque supporters.

There is a Spanish saying that sums up Moyes's first weeks in San Sebastian. "Vísteme despacio que tengo prisa - dress me slowly, I'm in a rush". Last summer's planning was reckless; former manager Jagoba Arrasate and general manager Loren Juarros failed when it comes to the subject of setting up a competitive squad. So nobody in San Sebastian expected big changes during Moyes's first weeks. He even remarked on the difficulties he faces during his initial press conference.

However, there is something about Moyes that is starting to change the gloomy faces into joyful ones. Motivation. If Jagoba Arrasate was "the good cop", the Scot is clearly adopting the bad cop role, keeping his distance from the players and instilling a professional approach to the team's play, in stark contrast to the bumbling approach which has blighted Sociedad over the last 15 months.

The basques have scored three early goals in their three last games at home. A matter of chance? I don't think so. We should recall that the team conceded the first goal in their first eight games of the season.

The Moyes effect goes further. Our "tiki taka style" - very ineffective during the first three months of competition - has turned into a more rudimentary approach. The reason? Antoine Griezmann, Asier Illarramendi or even Claudio Bravo - the best goalkeeper in the world with the ball at his feet- are no longer at the club so it did not make sense to keep the artistic footballing style that propelled Sociedad to the Champions League.

Real Sociedad used to pass the ball horizontally, without creating many chances and leaving themselves open to counter attacks when they lost the ball. Since Moyes's arrival, long passes are common. No russian roulette. No tiki taka. Somewhere in between.

Antoine Griezmann
After the sale of players such as Antoine Griezmann, a more pragmatic approach was needed at Sociedad.

Intensity, concentration and faith

The defence conceded silly goals every week during the first few months of the season, but the defenders and midfielders are now much closer together. Intensity, concentration and faith are the team's new watchwords. We are now in January and supporters are expecting a raft of loan deals with Premier League clubs, bringing the likes of Charlie Adam, Joel Campbell, Jack Rodwell or Adnan Januzaj to the club.

These transfer targets give a clear indication of Moyes's thoughts about the squad he inherited, and they have also raised great expectations in San Sebastian. Within a couple of weeks, the doubt and confusion have dissipated. This is the Moyes effect.

Someone might say that the victory over Barcelona was a matter of chance. That Messi's or Neymar's absence was the main reason for our triumph. That five clean sheets in eight games is the result of a lucky run of fixtures, rather than a shift in the dugout.

But, I am sorry to inform the doubters, it's Moyesey.

Oier Fano Dadebat is a Spanish journalist who divides his time between San Sebastian and London. You can find out more about him on Twitter @oierfano.