Hezbollah leader Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
Hezbollah leader Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah - Reuters

The Shiite Islamic militant group was the latest one to join the chorus against the US-produced film Innocence of Muslims.

Within days after the Yemeni-based al-Qaida urged the Muslims to take revenge for the film, Hezbollah's leader Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah has called for fresh protests in Lebanon.

The head of the militant group said Muslims should let the world know that they would not stay silent in the face of this insult.

Seeking to take advantage of the ongoing protests across the world Nasrallah said in a televised speech, "We should not only express our anger at an American embassy here or there. We should tell our rulers in the Arab and Muslim world that it is 'your responsibility in the first place' and since you officially represent the governments and states of the Muslim world you should impose on the United States, Europe and the whole world that our prophet, our Quran and our holy places and honour of our Prophet be respected."

The speech was broadcasted on Hezbollah's al-Mannar TV station, while he addressed from an unknown location. Nasrallah has the potential to pull a huge crowd of Shiite Muslims in Lebanon and is also backed by Shiite dominated Iran.

He went on to say that the low-budget movie Innocence of Muslims is the worst ever attack on Islam. It is worse than Salman Rushdie's Satanic verses or the burning of Koran in Afghanistan, he noted.

While protests continue to taunt the US embassies in every continent, he urged the protesters to conduct more such demonstrations in the coming weeks. Riots continue even after Washington officially washed off their hands over the film. Not less than dozen people have died of protests in several countries.

Days back, a movie titled 'Innocence of Muslims' surfaced which allegedly portrays Mohammed in a bad light fuelling a row across the world.

The Hezbollah chief accused the US intelligence for the film and insisted on consistent attacks on the US embassies. "The film was made and spread from the US. Muslims should say to the US: 'This happened in your state," said Nasrallah.

The group has planned several protests across Lebanon and the first such demonstration is to kick off from Beirut. The country has already witnessed protests against the movie from the Sunni majority areas.

Nasrallah said he postponed his announcement due to Pope's visit to the country.

Soon after his address, Lebanon which presently heads the Arab League's Foreign Ministers' Council has called for an emergency meeting.