Police in Hong Kong standing on raised, moving platforms used "pepper cannons" to fire what was described as "tear spray" at protesters.

Protesters complained about being burned by the substance. One, who gave his name as Yiu, told AFP it was "much stronger than pepper spray" used on earlier occasions by police.

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Riot police standing on moving platforms use tear spray during clash with protesters in the Mongkok districtAnthony Kwan/Getty Images
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A protester receives a blast of "tear spray"Anthony Kwan/Getty Images
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Protesters are sprayed with by riot police during a confrontation in the Mongkok shopping district of Hong KongTyrone Siu/Reuters
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Protesters use umbrellas to try to shield themselves from the "tear spray"Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images
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A protesters is helped after being sprayed with what police described as "tear spray"Philippe Lopez/AFP
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A protester receives treatment after being hit by "tear spray" during a confrontation with riot police on Portland StreetBobby Yip/Reuters
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Police use pepper spray to disperse pro-democracy protesters from a street in Mongkok districtChris McGrath/Getty Images

The chaotic scenes came as authorities cleared part of a pro-democracy protest camp in the bustling Mongkok district following a court order to reopen a road.

The gritty, working-class area across the harbour from the main protest site at Admiralty has been the scene of some of the most violent clashes during two months of pro-democracy demonstrations.

Workers in white helmets and vests removed wooden blockades from the road after demonstrators had dismantled tents and packed up their belongings.

The injunction was granted to a bus company which said the blockade had hurt business.

Protesters initially put up no resistance as workers started tearing down barricades, moving wooden pallets and other junk into the middle of an intersection to be taken away.

But as the authorities pushed down Argyle Street to remove tents and other debris, they faced defiance from protesters, who used delaying tactics such as asking for more time to pack up their belongings. At least 32 people were arrested.

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Journalists gather as workers remove a barricade in the Mongkok district of Hong KongPhilippe Lopez/AFP
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Workers remove a tent on one of the main streets occupied by protesters in the Mongkok shopping districtTyrone Siu/Reuters
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A protester reacts as he is pushed by a policeman during a confrontation on Portland Street in Mongkok shopping districtBobby Yip/Reuters
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Policemen check on a protester who fainted after he was arrestedBobby Yip/Reuters
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A pro-democracy protester speaks into a megaphone on Argyle Street in Mongkok districtAnthony Kwan/Getty Images
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Pro-democracy activists scream and gesture at a police officer after clashes broke out during the clearance of the protest site in the Mongkok districtChris McGrath/Getty Images
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Pro-democracy activists gesture at police on Argyle StreetChris McGrath/Getty Images
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Police attempt to arrest a pro-democracy protester during clashes at MongkokAnthony Kwan/Getty Images

Authorities are expected to enforce a second restraining order covering the rest of the Mongkok site on Wednesday 26 November.

"Tomorrow will be the main event," said Albert Chan of the radical pro-democracy People Power party. "There will be more people joining the resistance. Maybe there will be more arrests tomorrow."