New iPod range
Updated iPod touch has 64-bit processor and iPhone 6's 8MP camera, plus gold colour optionApple

Apple has finally updated its ageing iPod range, bringing a new gold colour option to all models and bringing the iPod touch's performance in line with the iPhone 6.

This is the first time the iPod range has been updated since 2012 (aside form a minor update in 2014), and while the Nano and Shuffle remain the same as before - apart from a new gold option for both and a pink version of the Shuffle - the sixth-generation touch sees some major updates.

The rear camera has been upgraded from 5 megapixels to 8MP, matching the iPhone 6 and iPad Air 2; the front-facer has also been boosted to the same FaceTime HD camera as the touch's older siblings.

Also matching Apple's flagship handset is the iPod's new 64-bit A8 processor for faster operation and better graphical performance during games. That processor will be joined by the iPhone 6's M8 chip which gives the new iPod touch a better understanding of how it is moving - useful for tracking fitness, steps and elevation changes.

Apple will sell the new iPod touch with iOS 8.4 and Apple Music is pre-installed.

A new 128GB model - double the storage of the previously largest iPod touch - costs £329, while the entry-level 16GB model costs £159 and the mid-range 32GB and 64GB models are priced at £199 and £249 respectively. The touch is available in silver, gold, Space Grey, pink, blue and red.

The overall design and screen of the new touch remains unchanged from the previous model, which means an iPhone 5s-copying 4in display with a resolution of 1136 x 640 and a Retina pixel density of 326 per inch.

As for the rest of the iPod range, the Nano and Shuffle have exactly the same specifications and prices as before. That means £129 for the 16GB Nano and £40 for the 2GB Shuffle.

Given this is the first major refresh for the iPod touch in nearly three years, it is unlikely that we'll be seeing another for quite some time - and who knows for how much longer the current Nano and Shuffle will stick around for, especially given their lack of iOS and the recent demise of the iPod Classic.