Asqa Mahmood
Aqsa Mahmood is one of an estimated 43 British women and girls to have gone to SyriaTwitter

Scottish jihadi bride, Aqsa Mahmood, who left her home in Glasgow to travel to Syria where she married an Islamic State fighter, has posted a rant against Syrians fleeing the country and seeking refuge in Europe.

The former pupil of one of the city's most exclusive girls' schools, Craigholme Secondary School, said Isis has made a number of new videos aimed at those fleeing Syria. She said these people were risking death by leaving the war torn country.

She wrote: "Recently the brothers who have put out multiple videos aimed at those who fled or are fleeing to the kuffar [non-Muslims] and their lands.

"It's sad to see people of the West flee and run to Allah and the Muslims to bring back their honour whilst these people run to the kuffar and think that seeking help from them will truly benefit them.

"Those who flee to Europe are not the poor, afflicted people of this land, they are the richer ones those who are off seeking to fulfill their whims and live life far from Allah's law.

"The Islamic State has opened its land to those who flee from war and seek refuge in Allah first and their brothers after that. They will get decent treatment and eat from what we eat rather than being caged off like infectious animals.

"I don't think they are afraid for the sake of their children as they know the risks, which include death, that they're taking just to get there," she said, according to STV News.

Mahmood also said that she would rather die in Syria than return home to her family in Glasgow. Her statement raised the ire of many, with the hastag #ummlayth receiving some strong comments against the jihadi bride.

One said she should be barred from returning to the UK while another said , saying that she should be put in a straightjacket and a padded cell.

Mahmood, 20, travelled to Syria in November 2013 and uses the nom de guerre Umm Layth in social media to propagate radical messages, including urging copycat attacks following the Boston Marathon bombing and the murder of British soldier Lee Rigby.