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Players from the Maasai Cricket Warriors run between the wicket during their friendly match in Mombasa
Daniel Ole Mamai (L) of the Maasai Cricket Warriors and his teammate Christopher Ole Ngais run between the wicket against the Jaffery's team during their friendly match in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa March 17, 2012. The Maasai Cricket Warriors are role models in their communities where they actively campaign against retrogressive and harmful cultural practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. Through cricket, they hope to promote healthier lifestyles and to also spread awareness about HIV/AIDS amongst youth. They have been invited to play in the Last Man Stands Twenty20 Championship in Cape Town, South Africa but are doubtful of their participation due to lack of sponsorshipsReuters
Ole Mamai of the Maasai Cricket Warriors and his teammate Ole Ngais run between the wicket against the Jaffery's team during their friendly match in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa
Daniel Ole Mamai (L) of the Maasai Cricket Warriors and his teammate Christopher Ole Ngais run between the wicket against the Jafferys team during their friendly match in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, March 17, 2012.REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
Jonathan Ole Meshami of the Maasai Cricket Warriors plays a shot during their friendly match in Mombasa
onathan Ole Meshami of the Maasai Cricket Warriors plays a shot against the Jaffery's team during their friendly match in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa March 17, 2012. The Maasai Cricket Warriors are role models in their communities where they actively campaign against retrogressive and harmful cultural practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. Through cricket, they hope to promote healthier lifestyles and to also spread awareness about HIV/AIDS amongst youth. They have been invited to play in the Last Man Stands Twenty20 Championship in Cape Town, South Africa but are doubtful of their participation due to lack of sponsorshipsReuters
A member of the Maasai Cricket Warriors team catches the ball during their friendly match in Mombasa
A member of the Maasai Cricket Warriors team catches the ball during their friendly match against the Jaffery's team in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa March 17, 2012.REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
Members of the Maasai Cricket Warriors prepare for their friendly match against the Jafferys team in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa
Members of the Maasai Cricket Warriors prepare for their friendly match against the Jafferys team in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, March 17, 2012.REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
Olengais, captain of the Maasai Cricket Warriors, plays a shot during their friendly match in Mombasa
Sonyanga Olengais, captain of the Maasai Cricket Warriors, plays a shot against the Jaffery's team during their friendly match in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa March 17, 2012.REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
Njayo Takare of the Maasai Cricket Warriors plays a shot against the Jafferys team during their friendly match in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa
Njayo Takare of the Maasai Cricket Warriors plays a shot against the Jafferys team during their friendly match in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, March 17, 2012. The Maasai Cricket Warriors are role models in their communities where they actively campaign against retrogressive and harmful cultural practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. Through cricket, they hope to promote healthier lifestyles and to also spread awareness about HIV/AIDS amongst youth. They have been invited to play in the Last Man Stands Twenty20 Championship in Cape Town, South Africa but are doubtful of their participation due to lack of sponsorships.Reuters
Members of the Maasai Cricket Warriors attend a practice session at the shores of the Indian Ocean in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa
Members of the Maasai Cricket Warriors attend a practice session at the shores of the Indian Ocean in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, March 17, 2012. The Maasai Cricket Warriors are role models in their communities where they actively campaign against retrogressive and harmful cultural practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. Through cricket, they hope to promote healthier lifestyles and to also spread awareness about HIV/AIDS amongst youth. They have been invited to play in the Last Man Stands Twenty20 Championship in Cape Town, South Africa but are doubtful of their participation due to lack of sponsorships.Reuters
Ole Ngais, captain of the Maasai Cricket Warriors, leaves the field after he was dismissed in Mombasa
Sonyanga Ole Ngais (L), captain of the Maasai Cricket Warriors, leaves the field after he was dismissed during their friendly match against the Jafferys team in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa March 17, 2012. The Maasai Cricket Warriors are role models in their communities where they actively campaign against retrogressive and harmful cultural practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. Through cricket, they hope to promote healthier lifestyles and to also spread awareness about HIV/AIDS amongst youth. They have been invited to play in the Last Man Stands Twenty20 Championship in Cape Town, South Africa but are doubtful of their participation due to lack of sponsorships.Reuters
Sonyanga Ole Ngais, captain of the Maasai Cricket Warriors, assists his teammates to dress-up before their friendly match against the Jafferys team in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa
Sonyanga Ole Ngais, captain of the Maasai Cricket Warriors, assists his teammates to dress-up before their friendly match against the Jafferys team in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, March 17, 2012. The Maasai Cricket Warriors are role models in their communities where they actively campaign against retrogressive and harmful cultural practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. Through cricket, they hope to promote healthier lifestyles and to also spread awareness about HIV/AIDS amongst youth. They have been invited to play in the Last Man Stands Twenty20 Championship in Cape Town, South Africa but are doubtful of their participation due to lack of sponsorships.Reuters

It is not war... this time!

The Maasai tribals from the Laikipia region in Kenya have exchanged their spears for cricket bats!

They are being encouraged to use cricket as a medium to empower their youth, root out social problems and bring positive change to the communities.

It promises to be a wonderful scene... the tribe's signature colourful garb instead of traditional cricket whites.

The tribe is actively campaigning against harmful cultural practices, such as Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and early childhood marriages. They are also looking to fight discrimination against women, in Maasailand.

The warriors hope that cricket can promote healthier lifestyles and also spread awareness about HIV/AIDS among their youth.

They also hope to be in Cape Town on 31 March, to take part in the Last Man Stands World Championships - a T-20 event - scheduled to run till 7 April. However, they are still short of travel funds and are on the lookout for sponsorships.

A glimpse of the practice session of Maasai Cricket Warriors...

This article was updated November 30, -0001 00:00 AM
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