Margaret Thatcher
Margaret Thatcher

Ding Dong The Witch is Dead is set to top the charts after a Facebook campaign in the wake of Margaret Thatcher's passing sent Judy Garland's hit soaring into the iTunes Top 30 download chart.

Within 24 hours of the announcement that the former Conservative leader had died, the song, which features in the 1939 musical The Wizard of Oz, had rocketed to number 26.

Ding Dong The Witch is Dead is sung by Dorothy, played by Garland, the Munchkins and Glinda the Good Witch, in Victor Fleming's American fantasy adventure film.

They belt out the track to celebrate the death of the Wicked Witch of the East after Dorothy "dropped a house on her".

The Facebook campaign posted a link to the song and urged people to download it. The group already has more than 2,500 members.

"Now get over to iTunes and make this number one !!" one user wrote.

Another critic said:  "She died in the Ritz, that £3000 a night hotel of opulent luxury. She shafted the poor to the end, what a vile old bag. Ding Dong the Wicked witch is dead."

Lord Bell, Baroness Thatcher's spokesman, confirmed that the Iron Lady, Britain's longest-serving and only female Prime Minister, died at the Ritz hotel after suffering a stroke. She was aged 87.

Thatcher, known for her hard-hitting leadership style, has divided opinion in life and now in death.

While many have paid tribute to politician, critics continue to condemn her neo-liberal economic policies which changed the political and economic landscape of Britain.

David Cameron, who once said in parliament, "I would rather be a child of Thatcher than a son of [Gordon] Brown" called the iconic leader "the greatest peacetime prime minister."

The National Union of Mineworkers said on its website: "Margaret Hilda Thatcher is gone but the damage caused by her fatally flawed politics sadly lingers on."

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