Photographer Will Burrard-Lucas has photographed some of Africa's most iconic species, in the Namibia region of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA).

In collaboration with WWF, Burrard-Lucas set up a camera trap, enabling him to photograph the animals in their natural environment without them being disturbed. Founder of Camtraptions and BeetleCam, Burrard-Lucas' use of camera traps within this project is of great benefit, due to the camera's subtlety in surveying land use and movement of large species. The traps are able to collect valuable images of wildlife without a photographer needing to be present.

The series comes ahead of Earth Hour, which is held from 8.30pm to 9.30pm on 19 March and is organised by WWF. The aim of Earth Hour is to encourage the world to switch off its lights for one hour, allowing people to take part in their own unique display of darkness.

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A lioness walks through the forest in the Namibia region of KAZAWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
A herd of elephants emerge from the forest in KAZA, Namibia regionWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
A hyena runs through the forest in the Namibia region of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA)Will Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
A wildebeest walks past the BeetleCam that was set up in the Namibia region of KAZAWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
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A porcupine is seen at night in the Namibia region of KAZAWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF

KAZA encompasses 109 million acres, crossing five southern Africa countries — Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe — KAZA is the largest transboundary conservation area in the world. It provides a home for nearly 50% of Africa's elephant population. WWF works with the governments of KAZA and also helps local communities to manage and benefit from the sustainable management of their natural resources.

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A common duiker in the Namibia region of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area, (KAZA)Will Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
Bush pigs are seen at nightWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
Giraffes are seen at night in KAZA, Namibia regionWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
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Two warthogs stand by the waterhole in the Namibia region of KAZAWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
An elephant covers itself in mud in KAZA, Namibia regionWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
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Guinea fowl walk in unison beside the waterhole in KAZA, Namibia regionWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
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A serval emerges from the forest Will Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
Common eland drink from the waterhole while guinea fowls go pastWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
A genet scuttles along a track at nightWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
A honey badger is seen at nightWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
A leopard cleans its paws in the Namibia region of  KAZAWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
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A kudu is seen in KAZA, Namibia regionWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
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Elands and giraffes walk at night in the Namibia region of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA)Will Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
An eland is seen in the darknessWill Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
A leopard moves towards the BeetleCam in the Namibia region of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area, (KAZA)Will Burrard-Lucas/ WWF
KAZA
Wild dog walks along a track in the Namibia region of the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA)Will Burrard-Lucas/ WWF