As the Nato summit is in progress in Chicago, protesters are constantly marching to the venue leading to arrests and stray incidents of violence.

Up to 45 protesters have been detained so far and dozens have been injured during the protests.

"I know that picture [of officers in riot gear pushing and hitting protesters] is going to be what people are going to run away here with. But cops are not here to be assaulted," Reuters quoted Chicago Police Chief Garry McCarthy as saying.

Although this is one of the largest demonstrations in Chicago in recent years, the number of protesters who have turned up falls far short of expectations. The protesters are part of the Coalition Against Nato-G8 group.

Thousands of demonstrators flooded the city against the Afghan war, climate change and several other grievances.

Having too many grievances under the same protest quite often dilutes the demonstration, some of them feel.

"It's crazy. There's so many people here. Having Nato in town is kind of exciting. It seems like there is so many messages people aren't really sure what they want to get accomplished. People just need to figure out what their argument is going to be," said Esther Westlake, a recent graduate, reported the Associated Press.

Some of the angry protesters were determined to take on the police. "This is what police brutally looks like. All we're trying to do is protest and the police are attacking us," said an angry young Ryan Zielinski who was hit by a baton as the police tried to push back the protestors, reported Reuters.

It was next to impossible for the protesters to see the world leaders since the meeting venue was guarded by high security and strong fences. The demonstrators were blocked by the police far away from the leaders.

A protester, with blood on his face after a strike to the head with a police baton, screams during an anti-NATO protest march in Chicago. The Pakistani’s have demanded the U.S. issues a public apology, change its policy on drone strikes in Pakistani territory and pay an increased transit fee of $5,000 per vehicle using the routes before they will consider re-opening the route.Reuters
Police stand with their shields during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
Demonstrators clash with police during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
Demonstrators clash with police during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
Civil rights activist Rev. Jesse Jackson marches with U.S. war veterans to the site of the NATO Summit in ChicagoReuters
Policemen in riot gear push protesters away from the site of the NATO Summit in ChicagoReuters
Police officers arrest a protester near the site of the NATO Summit in ChicagoReuters
Photographers are seen with blood running down their heads after they were caught between clashes with police and protesters near the site of the NATO Summit in Chicago.Reuters
Police officers arrest a protester near the site of the NATO Summit in ChicagoReuters
Demonstrators march during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
Police line up during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
Demonstrators clash with police during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
A protester sits on a man's shoulders during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
A participant, with an anti-NATO badge, takes part in an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
A demonstrator holds up a sign in front of police during an anti-NATO protest march in ChicagoReuters
A protester lies detained after clashing with police during the start of the NATO Summit in ChicagoReuters