Aaron Hernandez
Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots star is guilty of murder.Reuters

Convicted killer Aaron Hernandez has been moved to maximum security prison and given the official number of Prisoner W106228.

Hernandez is now at Souza-Baranowski Correctional Centre near Shirley and his tattoos are being examined for gang affiliations, according to a Mail Online report.

Sources close to the former New England Patriots football star was allegedly hooked on angel dust for at least a year before Odin Lloyd was shot dead.

A man who knew Hernandez said: "He was regularly high or out of his mind on Angel Dust.

"People who were in his circles knew about it and we would talk about how it turned him into a punk. He was consistently aggressive, arrogant and unpleasant.

"His dope man would bring it to his house and he would roll it in with some weed and smoke it with his friends.

"But the drugs made him turn out to be a monster."

During Hernandez' trial, the jury heard that on the night of the murder he smoked marijuana and he was filmed on camera dancing at a gas station while filling up his car after he smoked the drug.

A unanimous verdict found the former New England Patriots star guilty of murder by "extreme atrocity or cruelty". His conviction for the 2013 shooting death of Odin Lloyd carries an automatic life sentence without the possibility of parole.

Hernandez is still set to stand trial on double-murder charges for allegedly being the gunman in a drive-by shooting in the summer of 2012, according to a Forbes report. The arrest for the double-murder came only after the charges in the Lloyd murder case. Finally, there is also a civil case against Hernandez involving a shooting injury.

The civil suit accuses Hernandez of shooting Bradley Alexander in the face in February, 2013, after a night out. Alexander lost his right eye and is expected to testify in the double-murder case.

It's also emerged that a psychological profile was done on Hernandez before the 2010 that, according to the Wall Street Journal, the ex-NFL player enjoyed "living on the edge of acceptable behaviour."