French riot police patrol ahead of the unity rally in central Paris.
French riot police patrol ahead of the unity march in central ParisReuters

More than 1 million people are expected to march through Paris today, in support of the 17 victims murdered in the recent Paris attacks. With France's security on highest alert, a huge security operation will be deployed as fears remain that further terror attacks could happen.

With France's security on highest alert, a huge security operation will be deployed as fears remain that further terror attacks could happen.

Rooftops and drains have been checked over for explosive devices, enabling sharpshooters to be positioned on top of a number of strategic vantage points on rooftops.

Car parking has been suspended on all key roads and over 2,000 police officers have been deployed to help safeguard the rally. Synagogues, mosques, schools and other symbolic sites are all expected to be heavily guarded across France.

Several metro stations and streets will be completely closed off ahead of the 3pm (2pm GMT) start time. France's top anti-terrorist unit, RAID (Research, Assistance, Intervention, Deterrence), and GIGN (National Gendarmerie Intervention Group), a paramilitary special operations unit, are expected to be deployed across France.

A police source told France 24: "What is usually done for a large rally will be doubled, even tripled, given the threat and the personalities present."

A number of top dignitaries, including British Prime Minister David Cameron, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbass, are all expected to attend in support of the rally.

The death of Amedy Coulibaly
Coulibaly, armed with an AK-47 rifle, was gunned down as he charged towards French special forces at the Kosher supermarket in ParisSource: YouTube

Three gunman killed a total of 17 people in a terrifying three-day terror attack across the French capital of Paris.

French Algerian brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi massacred 12 people at the offices of the controversial satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on Wednesday.

The Kouachi brothers re-emerged on Friday morning, attempting to drive back into Paris after robbing a petrol station. A high-speed police chase ensued, forcing the Kouachi brothers to leave the road and enter a printing warehouse, where they took the manager hostage.

On the same day Amedy Coulibaly, 32, killed 27-year-old police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe, before entering a Jewish Kosher supermarket, killing four customers and taking 12 hostages.

Coordinated counterterror operations were carried out at both hostage scenes, which ended when police killed the Kouachi brothers and Coulibaly.