The Prince of Wales along with the Duchess of Cornwall visited the world's only surviving 17th century ship during their trip to Sweden where they joked that they would like to borrow it for the Queen's pageant.

Admiring the Vasa warship during their final day in Sweden, the Duchess mentioned that the ship is "pretty impressive. It's unbelievable. "It is very nice. Perhaps we could borrow it for the jubilee pageant. It would be very nice going down the Thames."

Built during the 1626-1628 period, the Swedish warship sank after sailing less than a nautical mile into its maiden voyage on 10 Aug, 1628.

The ship fell into obscurity after most of its valuable bronze cannon were salvaged in the 17th century. Later, during the late 1950s, it was located again in a busy shipping lane just outside the Stockholm harbour; it was salvaged with a largely intact hull in 1961.

Currently housed in a custom-built museum, the Vasa warship is regarded as one of Sweden's most popular tourist attractions and has been seen by over 29 million visitors since the year it was salvaged.

Although visitors are not allowed on board the ship, the royal couple was given permission to take a closer look and took a keen interest as museum staff gave them a guided tour.

Following this, the royals visited the Salta Kvarn mill and bakery in Jarna where they were given some of the finished products to try by head baker Manfred Enoksson.

They are now travelling to Copenhagen, Denmark, for the final leg of their eight-day tour of Scandinavia to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

Catch a glimpse of the royal's tour of the Vasa warship in the pictures given below:

Britain's Prince Charles (2nd L) and his wife, Duchess of Cornwall Camilla (L), pose with Sweden's King Carl Gustaf and Queen Silvia in front of a model of Swedish warship Vasa at the Vasa Museum in Stockholm March 24, 2012. Vasa sunk in 1628 on her maiden voyage and was recovered after 333 years in the waters of Stockholm's Strom.Reuters
Britain's Prince Charles (2nd R) and his wife, Duchess of Cornwall Camilla (C), view Swedish warship Vasa at the Vasa Museum in Stockholm March 24, 2012. Vasa sunk in 1628 on her maiden voyage and was recovered after 333 years in the waters of Stockholm?s Strom.Reuters
Britain's Prince Charles and his wife, Duchess of Cornwall Camilla, take a tour onboard Swedish warship Vasa at the Vasa Museum in Stockholm March 24, 2012. Vasa sunk in 1628 on her maiden voyage and was recovered after 333 years in the waters of Stockholm?s Strom.Reuters
Britain's Prince Charles (2nd L) and his wife, Duchess of Cornwall Camilla (L), pose with Sweden's King Carl Gustaf and Queen Silvia in front of a model of Swedish warship Vasa at the Vasa Museum in Stockholm March 24, 2012. Vasa sunk in 1628 on her maiden voyage and was recovered after 333 years in the waters of Stockholm's Strom.Reuters
Britain's Prince Charles (2nd R) and his wife, Duchess of Cornwall Camilla (C), view Swedish warship Vasa at the Vasa Museum in Stockholm March 24, 2012. Vasa sunk in 1628 on her maiden voyage and was recovered after 333 years in the waters of Stockholm?s Strom.Reuters
Britain's Prince Charles and his wife, Duchess of Cornwall Camilla, take a tour onboard Swedish warship Vasa at the Vasa Museum in Stockholm March 24, 2012. Vasa sunk in 1628 on her maiden voyage and was recovered after 333 years in the waters of Stockholm?s Strom.Reuters