Prince William and Kate Middleton return to “St. Andrews”  - where their Royal romance all began
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were voted the most influential couple in a recent poll. Toby Melville/Reuters

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West, Posh and Becks and US leader President Barack Obama and First Lady Michele Obama can all step aside. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have been named as the world's most influential couple by a poll of more than 2,000 British people.

The royal couple pipped David and Victoria Beckham into second place, while William's grandparents, the Queen and Prince Philip were voted the third place "power couple". Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie came fourth and the Obama's fifth. Despite helping thousands of people with the foundation that shares their name, Bill and Melinda Gates placed lower.

With Princess Charlotte recently following the birth of Prince George two years ago, the couple appears to be going from strength to strength. Jo Barnett, a dating coach and relationship expert, told the IBTimes that is was clear that William and Kate had "clearly got it together".

"They are not pompous, they are not arrogant and William really comes across as quite humble and that's quite an unusual quality in a celebrity or high profile couple," she said. She added that the couple had shown that family comes first and had often talked about taking time for themselves and with the children, something she said was vital for a healthy relationship.

"They seem to be taking time for themselves and having time away from the kids and also they are keeping their own individuality," she said. "It's important in any relationship that people do things that are for themselves and keep respect for each other."

But "power couples need to be strong for each other in good times and bad," behavioural psychologist and relationship coach Jo Hemmings, told The Mirror.

"Every relationship has issues," Carole Nyman, a couples counsellor based in London, told The Telegraph earlier this year.

"Nothing's 100%," she said. "But it's not about the issues themselves, it's about how you deal with it and what your patterns are."

Divorces are most likely to occur between the fourth and eighth wedding anniversary, according to the Office for National Statistics.