Self driving cars to get a boost from Obama administration
Google's driverless car seen at the company's headquarters in CaliforniaReuters

The goal of getting self-driving cars onto American roads will get a much-needed boost from the Obama administration.

Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will attend the Detroit Auto Show on 14 January to discuss the administration's efforts to speed up the introduction of self-driving cars in the US, Mark Rosekind, head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said.

According to a report by Auto News, President Barack Obama is also expected to attend the Detroit auto show on 20 January.

A legal framework for self-driving vehicles is yet to be established which is a major cause of concern for technology companies and car manufacturers. The forthcoming talks are expected to extend governmental efforts in ensuring that the legalities of driverless cars on American roads are outlined.

In December 2015, Rosekind said he opposed "patchwork" state regulations on self-driving vehicles and promised to bring in a more "flexible, nimble" approach to writing new rules to be incorporated into the existing legal framework.

The California Department of Motor Vehicles proposed state regulations that would necessitate all driverless cars to have a steering wheel, manual brakes and an accelerator. The rules also required a person to be seated in the traditional driver's seat and be prepared to take over the manual controls in case the automative system malfunctions.

Google, along with a few other automobile companies, have expressed concerns regarding California's state regulations for driverless cars. The tech giant has requested clarifications on the guidelines for self-driving cars in order to avoid accidents, which could lead to expensive litigations.

A Google spokesperson confirmed the company will be present at the Obama administration's announcement on Thursday 14 January, according to a Reuters report. Other automobile manufacturing giants are also expected to attend the event.