Sex toy hack Trend Micro CeBIT
Experts at CeBIT show how easy a cyber attacker could hack into a sex toy and why it's not just for kicks.iStock

It seems nothing is safe from the reach of a hacker, not even your sex toys. A demonstration by software company Trend Micro showed how easy it is to remotely turn on the stimulating devices using just a laptop.

During a news conference at the CeBIT technology fair in Germany a spokesperson for Trend Micro pulled out a neon-pink vibrator and, without touching it, brought it buzzing to life by typing a few lines of code. But it wasn't just for thrills, it was an effort to highlight how the increasing number of devices connecting to networks can pose a big security risk.

"If I hack a vibrator it's just fun, but if I can get to the back-end, I can blackmail the manufacturer," said Raimund Genes, Chief Technology Officer at Trend Micro.

Of course, this demonstration was only made possible using a new 'smart' sex toys with built-in connectivity allowing them to be controlled remotely. Traditional does-what-it-says-on-the-tin toys with no other output than a buzz are not at risk at giving away your personal data to prying cyber crooks.

With Internet of Things (IoT) devices thrusting their way into homes in all shapes and sizes, such as security cameras, smart thermostats and smartphone-controlled appliances the opportunities for hackers to exploit vulnerabilities in private networks is increasing. Recently, it was revealed owners of webcams used to monitor their sleeping children were being spied on by hackers and Panasonic's security team managed to hack into a high-tech toilet in Japan.