North Sea oil rig
Staff at a BP-owned oil rig in the North Sea were forced to evacuate after an unmanned barge threatened to crash into it. Reuters

Footage has emerged of enormous waves battering a North Sea oil rig as Storm Frank passes overhead. Workers on the rig said the floating platform had become like a rollercoaster as it was thrown around in the rough seas.

Oil rig worker Gordan Murray, who uploaded the video yesterday (30 December 2015), wrote: "So – wee storm Frank up here in the North Sea, been going for 48hrs now! This was filmed from inside the accommodation and in normal conditions these windows are normally about 90ft above the water."

The video has been viewed more than 900,000 times. When asked what being on the floating platform was like, Murray replied: "Imagine the biggest rollercoaster in the world then multiply it by 10." The storm saw waves reached 15 metres high in parts of the North Sea, according to Reuters.

The is follows the news that one person has died and two others were injured after a freak wave hit another oil rig in the North Sea's Troll field, off the coast of Norway. The accommodation block on the Chinese-owner COSL Innovator drilling rig was hit by the wave at about 4pm (GMT) yesterday, with staff then airlifted to Norway. The rig was taken off the well as a precaution and is currently heading to shore.

Just hours later, more than 200 people were also forced to evacuate a BP-owned oil rig in the Valhall area, between the UK and Denmark. An unmanned barge broke anchor during the storm and threatened to crash into the platform, BP officials said. Helicopters arrived in the early hours of this morning to airlift staff to other rigs, and production was put into emergency shutdown. ConocoPhilips also airlifted 145 workers from its Ekofisk oil field just north of Valhall.

Officials said the barge eventually passed the rig without incident and staff were able to return to the platform.

So - wee storm Frank up here in the North Sea, been going for 48hrs now! This was filmed from inside the accommodation and in normal conditions these windows are normally about 90ft above the water...

Posted by Gordon Murray on Wednesday, December 30, 2015