Film still of Elsa Lanchester and Boris Karloff in The Bride of Frankenstein, 1939 © Universal / The Kobal Collection
Film still of Elsa Lanchester and Boris Karloff in James Whales' 1939 horror film The Bride of Frankenstein.Universal/The Kobal Collection

With the advent of Halloween, the British Library is showcasing an exhibition on Gothic art, literature and cinema.

Alongside the manuscripts of classic gothic novels such as Frankenstein and Dracula, there is also a Victorian vampire slaying kit.

From Nosferatu to the most recent zombie thrillers, the exhibition uses movie clips, film posters, costume designs and props to show how Gothic themes and literature have been adapted for stage and screen, popularising characters like Dracula, Dr Jekyll and mr Hyde, and Frankenstein's monster.

Lead curator of the exhibition, Tim Pye, said: "Gothic is one the most popular and influential modes of literature and I'm delighted that Terror and Wonder is celebrating its rich 250 year history."

Victorian Vampire Hunting Kit
Victorian vampire hunting kitRoyal Armouries (XII.11811
Artist Dave McKean's new artwork for Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination
Artist Dave McKean's new artwork for Terror and Wonder: The Gothic ImaginationBritish Library
First illustration of Frankenstein's monster. Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. London, 1831.
First illustration of Frankenstein's monster. Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. London, 1831.British Library
Plague of the Zombies poster.
Plague of the Zombies poster.BFI National Archive
Image taken from the series 'Whitby Goths' by Martin Parr
Image taken from the series 'Whitby Goths' by Martin ParrMagnum photos/ Rocket Gallery, 2014
Night of the Demon film poster.
Night of the Demon film poster.BFI National Archive
The Nightmare, after Henry Fuseli. Print made by Thomas Burke. London, 1783.
The Nightmare, after Henry Fuseli. Print made by Thomas Burke. London, 1783.Trustees of the British Museum