Nokia X

Ever since it was launched in 2013, Motorola's Moto G has been heralded as the best budget Android phone on the market. However, Nokia announced a range of Android phones at this year's MWC in February.

Among the three handsets that were unveiled, the Nokia X happens to be the cheapest of the lot. How does the handset stand up against the Moto G? Let's compare the smartphones to find out.


Starting with weight, the Moto G(143 grams) happens to be heavier than the Nokia X(128 grams) by a small margin. However, when you hold it, the difference is negligible. Moto G lets users stay black and sober by default, but you can add a splash of colour by using some of the swapable back covers. The Nokia X comes in some intense colours like Asha and Lumia phones.


In this round, the Moto G clearly beats the Nokia X with its stunning HD display. It offers a 1280×720 pixel resolution that churns out 326 ppi. The Nokia X on the other hand uses a WVGA 480×800 pixels display that churns out 233ppi.


The Nokia X is powered by a dual-core 1GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 SoC and 512MB of RAM. This happens to be less powerful when compared to the Moto G's 1.2GHz Snapdragon 400 SoC and 1GB of RAM.

The extra RAM on the Moto G will make a huge difference when it comes to everyday usage and running resource-heavy apps. In other words, the Moto G is easily the better performer among the two.


The Nokia X uses a 3 MP rear facing camera as its primary shooter. The moto-g competes with a 5MP camera in the rear which has the ability to shoot 720p video (also at 30fps). While the Moto G has a decent 1.3 MP front camera, the Nokia X has no shooter for those narcissistic slefies.


Another department where the Moto G trumps over the Nokia X, Motorola's smartphone uses a 2,070mAh unit, offering a full day of charge. The Nokia X comes with a much smaller 1,500mAh that might not get you through an entire day.


The key difference between the two devices happens to be their approach towards Android. While the Moto G offers a near-Nexus experience, the Nokia X tries something very different.

The Finnish phone maker used the Nokia X OS on its handset, which is nothing but a modified version of Android. It does not have access to Google services like other Android phones and offers a selection of Nokia and Microsoft apps to make up for it.

Instead of the Google Play Store that is seen on most Android phones, users will have to make do with Nokia store and support from Yandex for search. Hence, the Moto G offers a stock Android experience, while the Nokia X strives to give users something entirely different.


The Nokia X+ and Nokia XL arrive in Q2 this year and they will be priced at €89, €99 (X+) and €109 (XL). The Moto G (8GB) can be picked up for £129 in the UK.