Archaeological area of ​​Torre Argentina in Rome where researchers claim to have found the exact site where Roman general Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in 44 BC. (Photo:Antonio Monterroso/CSIC)
Archaeological area of ​​Torre Argentina in Rome where researchers claim to have found the exact site where Roman general Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in 44 BC. (Photo:Antonio Monterroso/CSIC)

Archaeologists at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) claim to have found the exact site where Roman general Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in 44 BC.

Ancient Roman texts depict that Julius Caesar was assassinated at Curia of Pompey, one of the first theatres of ancient Rome, by a group of senators while he was addressing a meeting of the senate seated on a chair. His murder led to civil wars in the region.

"We always knew that Julius Caesar was assassinated in the Curia of Pompey on March 15, 44 BC, because the classical texts and we pass it on, but so far had not recovered any material evidence of this fact so often depicted in historicist painting and film," CSIC researcher Antonio Monterroso said in a statement.

About 2,056 years later, archaeologists have excavated the spot of his death in the remains of Curia of Pompey, which is today located in the archaeological area of Torre Argentina, in the historic centre of the Italian capital.

"It's very attractive, in civic and citizenship to thousands of people, who today take the bus and tram right next to where 2056 years ago Julius Caesar was stabbed," Monterroso added.

What has led researchers to confirm their finding as the assassination site of Caesar is a 3m wide and over 2m high concrete structure.

"A concrete structure of three metres wide and over two metres high, placed by order of Augustus (adoptive son and successor of Julius Caesar) to condemn the assassination of his father, has given the key to the scientists. This finding confirms that the General was stabbed right at the bottom of the Curia of Pompey while he was presiding, sitting on a chair, over a meeting of the Senate," CSIC researchers said.

Researchers said that the place where Julius Caesar was stabbed was sealed with a four-walled concrete structure. However, they said, they did not know "if this closure also involved that the building ceased to be totally accessible."

Archaeological area of ​​Torre Argentina in Rome where researchers claim to have found the exact site where Roman general Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in 44 BC. (Photo:Antonio Monterroso/CSIC)
Archaeological area of ​​Torre Argentina in Rome where researchers claim to have found the exact site where Roman general Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in 44 BC. (Photo:Antonio Monterroso/CSIC)