4th of July
Businessman and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump reacts to supporters during a back-yard reception in Bedford, New Hampshire, June 30, 2015.REUTERS/Dominick Reuter

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump says what he wants no matter the consequences. On 16 June, Trump launched his presidential campaign and also set off a firestorm that is destroying the Republican brand.

The reality TV star's open feud with Spanish-language network Univision and the country of Mexico has incensed Latinos in the US. Despite his comments calling Mexican immigrants "rapists" and drug smugglers, the 69-year-old has seen a rise in poll numbers, putting him behind Jeb Bush in second place.

Business Insider noted that Trump's continued rise in the polls will mean he will have a chance to participate in the first GOP primary debate. That's exactly what the Republican establish does not want and what Democrats are rooting for.

"I think there's a real risk that he makes the 6 August debate look like a clown show," chief political strategist at the Potomac Research Group Greg Valliere told Business Insider. "There will be plenty of outrageous Trump sound bites on the morning news the next day."

Former George W Bush press secretary Ari Fleischer recently told Politico: "Donald Trump is like watching a roadside accident. Everyone pulls over to see the mess. And Trump thinks that's entertainment. But running for president is serious. And the risk for the party is he tarnishes everybody."

Trump not only stands to make the GOP look like a foolish political party, but he is also ruining any chances it has at attracting Latino voters.

According to The Hill, Republican strategist David Payne said: "He's not hurting other candidates. He is risking the Republican brand." Fellow GOP strategist Ron Bonjean, who also spoke to The Hill about the GOP's efforts to recruit Hispanic voters, suggested Trump is hurting those efforts.

Democrats are, on the other hand, cheering on Trumps foray into the race. Veteran Democratic strategist and adviser to Priorities USA Action Paul Begala told the Washington Post: "I am a person of faith — and the Donald's entry into this race can only be attributed to the fact that the good Lord is a Democrat with a sense of humour."