Alastair Cook
Alastair Cook has dragged England back into the game at EdgbastonGetty Images

England captain Alastair Cook led the hosts' fightback on day three of the third Test match against Pakistan at Edgbaston. The record-breaking batsman scored an unbeaten 64 to drag England back into the match, having earlier conceded a first innings deficit of 103.

Cook, 31, produced an untypically fluent knock during an unbeaten opening partnership of 120 with the under-pressure Alex Hales (50 not out). The left-hander's effort came after England had earlier restricted Pakistan to 400 all out, with the tourists losing their last four wickets for 42 runs.

The first wicket of the day to fall was that of Younis Khan, who edged Chris Woakes behind to Jonny Bairstow for 31. He was soon followed back to the pavilion by Asad Shafiq, who was bowled by Stuart Broad for an 18-ball duck.

Pakistan captain Misbah-ul-Haq continued his good form to make 56 before he was bowled by James Anderson, who was subsequently removed from the England attack for running on the danger area. Thereafter, the Pakistan wickets fell in a heap, with Yasir Shah being run out, before Mohammad Amir and Rahat Ali were both dismissed.

As England walked out to bat, they faced the unenviable task of having to overcome a significant shortfall. But Hales and Cook, in particular, were able to survive until the close on what appears to be an increasingly docile pitch in Birmingham.

Hales played a more disciplined innings than has recently been the case, bringing up his much-needed half-century with a single from the final ball of the day. Cook, on the other hand, showed his composure and class to nullify the Pakistan seam bowlers before taking advantage of some waywardness from the Shah, who barely turned a ball in the innings.

England's outstanding opening partnership has dragged them back into the game and with two days still remaining at Edgbaston, all three results are still possible. The hosts will look to establish a size lead on day four and put Pakistan under pressure in the final innings.