On the first Sunday since a police helicopter crashed through the roof of the crowded Clutha pub on Friday night, Glasgow has been mourning its dead.

The final death toll from the incident stands at eight, with 14 people still being treated in hospital for serious injuries.

Three of the eight dead have been named as Gary Arthur, 48, from the Paisley area, a customer at the pub; helicopter pilot David Traill, 51; and police officer Kirsty Nelis.

At the time of the crash, around 120 customers were inside the pub enjoying live music from a local band.

Scotland's Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said: "Our hearts go out to everyone who has been bereaved. It is impossible to imagine the grief and loss that they are experiencing.

"They should know that the thoughts and prayers of everyone across the city, and indeed across Scotland, are with them at this unimaginably difficult time."

The Police Scotland helicopter that crashed was a Eurocopter EC135 T2.

In a statement, Eurocopter said: "An accident investigation team from Eurocopter is on its way to Scotland to assist the UK Air Accident Investigation Branch and the BFU (German AAIB) in its efforts to investigate the cause of the accident."

Rescue workers lift a rotor blade from the site of a police helicopter crash onto the Clutha Pub in central GlasgowReuters/Andrew Winning
Rescue workers lift the rear rotor blades from the site of a police helicopter crash onto the Clutha PubReuters/Andrew Winning
Members of the emergency services use a cherry picker to access the crash siteReuters/Andrew Winning
A well wisher places a bouquet near the site of a police helicopter crash on to the Clutha Pub in central GlasgowReuters/Andrew Winning
Glasgow's Celtic team stand for a minute's silence for the victims of the Glasgow helicopter crashReuters/Russell Cheyne
Rescue workers survey the wreckage of a police helicopter which crashed onto the roof of the Clutha pub in GlasgowReuters/Russell Cheyne