Eid
A man prepares ketupat as special Eid al-Fitr dishes in Surabaya, Indonesia (Reuters)

The festival of Eid al-Fitr will bring an end to the fasting month of Ramadan, one of the most important periods in the Islamic calendar. Eid, also known as the Feast of the Breaking of the Fast, will see Muslims all over the world celebrate with prayer, food and gift-giving.

Eid al-Fitr is also known as Sweet Eid because of the popularity of sweet dishes eaten during the celebration. Dishes vary widely depending on the country and individual tastes, but it is popular to recognise the breaking of the fast with a small breakfast.

Eid al-Fitr is the first day of the Islamic month of Shawwal, but the date on which the festival begins is determined by a confirmed sighting of the new moon after a month of fasting, so the date can change. The United Kingdom will celebrate Eid al-Fitr on 17 July this year.

eid food
A woman lays out traditional date-filled cookies on a baking tray in preparation for Eid al-Fitr in Palestine (Getty)
Eid food
A man makes meat pastries in Sidon, south Lebanon (Reuters)
Eid food
Nuts, dried grapes, apples, bread and tea are served at a home in Kabul, Afghanistan, during Eid al-Fitr (Getty)
Eid food
Children enjoy a meal during Eid al-Fitr celebrations in Mexico City (Reuters)
Eid food
Ketupat are prepared at the traditional market as special Eid al-Fitr dishes (Getty)
Eid food
A boy drinks rose syrup as he breaks his fast with others at a mosque in Peshawar (Reuters)