High-school and college students in Montpellier, southern France, were sprayed with tear gas when clashing with riot police on 14 April as they protested over the government's decision to examine the contested labour law reforms. If such reforms were introduced, they would be a serious attack on the social rights of many French citizens.

Alongside workers, the young people of France have taken a prominent role in the protests, which have been going on for weeks. Although many have been peaceful, some have become violent. Riot police used tear gas against the masked demonstrators standing outside Le Corum, a convention centre in Montpellier. Children who are still in high-school education were seen at the rally and many were detained by police.

France labour reforms
Students throw projectiles at riot police in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP
France labour reforms
Police officers detain a student in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP
France labour reforms
Police officers arrest a high-school student in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP
France labour reforms
Students throw projectiles at police in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP
France labour reforms
Students run from tear gas in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP
France labour reforms
Police officers face students in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP

Montpellier is one of over 30 cities in France which has staged protests against the upcoming labour reform plans.The social media movement "Nuit Debout", or "Standing Night" have occupied the Place de la Republique in Paris every night, to express their dissatisfaction with the leaders and political processes of France, along with other issues such as green economy, women in the workplace and the failings of capitalism. Every night, hundreds of students and workers pitch their tents around the Parisian square, which has become a symbol of national unity since the 2015 Paris attacks.

France labour reforms
Supporters of social media-driven movement "Nuit Debout" raise their hands as they gather on the Place de la Republique in ParisChristian Hartmann/ Reuters
France labour reforms
Supporters of social media-driven movement "Nuit Debout" gather on the Place de la Republique in ParisChristian Hartmann/ Reuters
France labour reforms
Supporters of social media-driven movement "Nuit Debout" kiss as they gather on the Place de la Republique in ParisChristian Hartmann/ Reuters
France labour reforms
Supporters of social media-driven movement "Nuit Debout" gather on the Place de la Republique in ParisChristian Hartmann/ Reuters
France labour reforms
President of the French Right to Housing association (DAL, Droit au Logement) Jean-Baptiste Eyraud takes part in the "Nuit Debout" movement on the Place de la Republique in ParisJoel Saget/ AFP
France labour reforms
The "Parole de portrait" initiative, displaying portraits and quotes of participants, is pictured during the "Nuit Debout" movement on the Place de la Republique in ParisJoel Saget/ AFP

France has seen frequent strikes and protests since the movement began on 9 March. Organisers are calling for more to be scheduled on weekends to allow more people to take part. Organisers have called for more substantial marches against the reform to happen in early May.

France labour reforms
Police officers throw tear gas canisters at students in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP
France labour reforms
French students and high-school pupils demonstrate against the labour reform laws in Paris. The banner reads: "We are no boss fodder", a play word associating the words "cannon" with "patrons" meaning "boss" in FrenchThomas Samson/ AFP
France labour reforms
Police officers face students in Montpellier, southern FranceSylvain Thomas/ AFP