The Imitation Game, the biopic of the brilliant mathematician Alan Turing who helped to crack the Enigma code is finally out in cinemas today, and in conjunction with the film, a new exhibition of the costumes, props and sets is now on at Bletchley Park (Read: The Imitation Game: Bletchley Park and the Computers That Helped Alan Turing Break the Nazi's Enigma [Photos]).

Entitled The Imitation Game: The Exhibition, the new exhibition showcases some of the costumes worn by Benedict Cumberbatch (Alan Turing) and Keira Knightley (Joan Clarke) in the film, as well as an array of movie props and even a recreation of one of the movie sets.

One of the suits worn by Benedict Cumberbatch in his role as Alan Turing, and the recreation of Turing's desk
One of the suits worn by Benedict Cumberbatch in his role as Alan Turing, and the recreation of Turing's deskShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com

Bletchley Park, located in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire was where the UK's Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) had its base during the war from 1938 onwards.

Turing was highly influential in the development of computer science, and his design and theoretical work with fellow cryptanalyst Gordon Welchman for the Bombe was instrumental in helping British intelligence discover what the Germans were planning.

In particular, the giant Bombe machines were used to crack encrypted military communication messages that were sent using electromechanical cipher machines known as "Enigma" machines.

Here are some of the props you can expect to see:

One of the cogs from the Bombe, built specially for use in The Imitation Game
One of the cogs from the Bombe, built specially for use in The Imitation GameShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
Keira Knightley and Benedict Cumberbatch costumes at Bletchley Park
From left: Sherborne School uniforms (from Alan Turing's childhood), an outfit worn by Keira Knightley as Joan Clarke and a suit worn by Benedict Cumberbatch. These costumes were featured in the "picnic scene"Shaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
Some of the movie props replicated from real documents using during the war at Bletchley Park
Some of the movie props replicated from real documents using during the war at Bletchley ParkShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
A close-up of Keira Knightley's Joan Clarke costume for the
A close-up of Keira Knightley's Joan Clarke costume for the "picnic scene" in The Imitation GameShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
A hat worn by Keira Knightley and the suitcase she carries when she comes to Bletchley Park in the film
A hat worn by Keira Knightley and the suitcase she carries when she comes to Bletchley Park in the filmShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
A recreation of the bar scene. Visitors to Bletchley Park can pose at the bar for photos and emulate the scene in the film
A recreation of the bar scene in The Imitation Game. Visitors to Bletchley Park can pose at the bar for photos and emulate the scene in the filmShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
A recreation of Commander Alastair Denniston's office in the mansion and his military uniform
A recreation of Commander Alastair Denniston's office in the mansion and his military uniform. Denniston was responsible for recruiting Turing from Cambridge, together with other talented minds.Shaun Armstrong /mubsta.com

Bletchley Park boasted a mansion and 58 acres of land, with operations that soon expanded from the mansion into wooden huts on the grounds. At its height, there were 10,000 men and women working there in 1944.

There were a lot of young people and although the hours were very long, a thriving community sprung up where employees could socialise at social events after work, and many people met their spouses at Bletchley Park.

Inside Bletchley Park: Where Alan Turing Cracked the Enigma MachineIBTimes UK
The display at Bletchley Park showing the Enigma Machine and the Bombe Machine that were built specially for filming
The Imitation Game display at Bletchley Park showing the Enigma Machine in the glass case, as well as the specially-built Bombe Machine on the rightShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
A Turing Bombe Machine, restored to its former glory with all the cogs for the film
A Turing Bombe Machine, restored to its former glory with all the cogs for the filmShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com

Codebreaking in the huts was a long, painstaking process that took many hours a day. The Bombe Machines that Turing designed were able to work out the correct possible settings for the Enigma machine when it had encrypted a particular message, which were then fed to the TypeX machine.

The TypeX machines would spit out long tapes of code, which the codebreakers would then have to manually work out which letters had been switched by the machine to figure out what the message said.

Message tapes of encrypted code with notes on possible variations of what each letter could be
Message tapes of encrypted code with notes on possible variations of what each letter could beShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com

If you know much about Alan Turing's life, you'll know that it was cut tragically short when he died of cyanide poisoning in a suspected suicide. The film covers this and these are the props related to the burglary of his home, which uncovered the fact that he was gay.

Recreations of documents from the Manchester City Police detailing the robbery on Turing's home in 1952
Recreations of documents from the Manchester City Police detailing the robbery on Turing's home in 1952Shaun Armstrong /mubsta.com
A replica of a bottle of cyanide, similar to one that was in Turing's home chemistry kit
A replica of a bottle of cyanide, similar to one that was in Turing's home chemistry kitShaun Armstrong /mubsta.com