The winners of the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015, with the overall prize going to the French photographer Luc Jamet for his image Eclipse Totality over Sassendalen. The image of the total solar eclipse was taken 100m above the valley of Sassendalen in the Norwegian territory of Svalbard.

Marek Kukula, one of the judges of the award, said: "The total solar eclipse was one of the astronomical highlights of the year and Luc Jamet has captured it perfectly. I love the way that the icy landscape of Svalbard reflects and intensifies the evocative colours of the sky – colours that only occur during the few minutes of totality, and which make any eclipse an unforgettable experience."

Other winning images included an aurora taken in the Abisko National Park in Lapland, a huge searing hot loop of plasma radiating from the surface of the sun and an image of the Comet C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy, taken by 15-year-old George Martin.

BBC Sky at Night Magazine's editor Chris Bramley, another competition judge, said: "The quality of this year's field of over 2,700 images from across the globe meant that there was some lively debate over the judging. Each and every category contained images of a jaw-dropping standard."

Eclipse Totality over Sassendalen
Overall winner: The total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 seen from Svalbard – one of only two habitable locations that were able to witness totality – just 16 seconds after it began. The image shows totality about 100m above the large valley of Sassendalen situated on the only permanently inhabited island of the Norwegian archipelago. Venus can also be seen in the photograph, as a bright spot in the upper left of the image. Luc Jamet/National Maritime Museum
The Magnificent Omega Centauri
Stars & nebulae winner: The Magnificent Omega Centauri: The globular cluster, Omega Centauri, is a dense orb of approximately 10 million stars, many of which are redder, cooler and even older than our Sun. The cluster can be found 15,800 light years away from Earth and has a diameter of 150 light years. Ignacio Diaz Bobillo/National Maritime Museum