Paul Scholes
Paul Scholes says new players are required to make Louis van Gaal's new system workGetty Images

Manchester United's current squad are unable to adapt to the newest playing style adopted by manager Louis van Gaal and must sign further players to mirror Barcelona, according to former midfielder Paul Scholes.

Van Gaal spent £150m ($222m) on new players during the 2014 summer transfer window and against Arsenal in the FA Cup decided on a new system that saw his centre-back pull wide and full-backs push into attacking roles – similar to the Barcelona team under Pep Guardiola.

But his most recent change to how United play failed to inspire his side to victory as Nacho Monreal and Danny Welbeck scored, as Arsenal reach the FA Cup semi-final where they face Football League opposition for a place in the final.

For United, Van Gaal faces six pivotal matches in the coming weeks that will likely dictate their chances of finishing in the top four and going forward beyond this campaign, Scholes says another squad overhaul is required if they are to stick with Van Gaal's latest philosophy.

"United have spent around £220m in the last three transfer windows and yet I would question whether they have the players to operate this system," Scholes told the Independent. "Against Arsenal, there were times when United went more direct to Marouane Fellaini but not as much as might be expected.

"For what other reason was he in the team? At least it gave United a chance to play in their opponents' half. It might be a bit prehistoric, and there is no chance that Van Gaal will want to do it long term, but if United keep playing the way they are, they will be found out against better sides.

The ex-England international added: "What I find hard to understand is how, in March, United are playing another new style with no evidence that they have the personnel to do it. Managers live and die by their recruitment. You buy the right players for the system that you believe will be successful. I don't believe that the club have achieved that balance."