Oscar Pistorius mental condition claim is
Oscar Pistorius mental condition claim is "a fallback position," claimed prosecutor Gerrie Nel during the runner's murder trialGetty

Oscar Pistorius is set to re-enter the public spotlight when his murder trial resumes next week following the completion of a raft of mental health tests.

Six weeks after the South African track star entered Weskoppies Psychiatric Hospital as an outpatient, a verdict is due on his mental health.

The provisional date is due some time next week at North Gauteng High Court, in a judgement which will have significant ramifications for the trial.

Fallen star Pistorius is accused of murdering his girlfriend, model Reeva Steenkamp, on Valentine's Day last year. He denies the charge, claiming he thought intruders had broken into his luxury home.

A court spokesman in Pretoria said the 27-year-old has been examined by up to four experts during his time at Weskoppies.

Nathi Mncube said: "It has been 30 days so his evaluation is completed. We must receive the reports from the specialists and then the court will determine the way forward.

"You have three or four people writing different reports. The court could receive one report or more. Hopefully we will have them on Monday but I can't say for certain."

Three psychiatrists and one clinical psychologist have compiled reports on Pistorius's mental health, which are now set to be presented to the court.

The lengthy adjournment in the world's most high-profile trial was ordered following evidence from a defence witness who claimed Pistorius had a mental problem called Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD). DEr Meryll Vorster told the trial it meant he reacted to situations differently than people without the condition.

If it can be shown Pistorius was impaired by GAD when he shot dead Steenkamp, then he could be found to be not responsible for his actions and cleared of murder.

But if it is revealed Pistorius has a normal mental health condition, then his defence could face complete collapse. Much of the disabled runner's case rests upon his fear of crime.