Representational image of out-of-body experience
Representational image of out-of-body experienceastralproject/facebook

A University of Ottawa graduate student has come up with an amazing description of an out-of-body experience she had.

According to a case study published in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, the woman not only described what the actual state was like but researchers studied her brain while she had this "extra-corporeal experience."

When in such a state she said she could see herself in the air above her body. She could watch herself move but was aware that her 'real' body was not moving.

"I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving," she told the researchers.

"There is no duality of body and mind when this happens, not really. In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving. I am the one moving – me – my body."

"For example, if I 'spin' for long enough, I get dizzy. I do not see myself above my body. Rather, my whole body has moved up. I feel it as being above where I know it actually is. I usually also picture myself as moving up in my mind's eye, but the mind is not substantive. It does not move unless the body does," she added.

According to a report in The Blaze, she first remembers willing herself out of her body when she was in preschool, using it as a "distraction during the time kids were asked to nap."

As she grew older, she assumed "everyone could do it."

The student claimed she could voluntarily enter an out-of-body experience. This was a lucky break for scientists, who were able to scan her brain during the episode, reports Yahoo.

MRI analysis and questionnaires were part of the tests researchers conducted in the case study.

They discovered that "the brain during such 'extra-corporeal experiences' exhibited activation in areas that are consistent with other studies about out-of-body experiences, which neurologists had associated with hallucinations," states The Blaze report.