Switzerland's President Simonetta Sommaruga (L), Turkey's Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (2ndL), Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko (3rdL), Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Secretary-General Angel Gurria (3rdR), Belgian P
Switzerland's President Simonetta Sommaruga (L), Turkey's Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (2ndL), Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko (3rdL), Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Secretary-General Angel Gurria (3rdR), Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel (2ndR) take part with dozens of foreign leaders in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of ParisReuters

Turkey's prime minister Ahmet Davutoglu has slammed his Israeli counterpart Benjamin Netanyahu, saying that he committed crimes against humanity "like the Paris attackers".

Davutoglu, who like Netanyahu attended Sunday's unity march in Paris after the deadly attacks that left 17 people dead, also said that Turkey "will not allow insults to our Prophet [Mohammed]".

"Netanyahu committed crimes against humanity just like the Paris attackers; his attendance to anti-terror rally does not change this fact," Davutoglu said, referring to last summer's Gaza war, the deadly 2010 Israel's assault on a Turkish aid flotilla and Israel's occupation of the West Bank.

Earlier, Israel's hawkish foreign minister Avigdor Lieberman had accused Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan of being an "anti-Semitic neighbourhood bully".

Davutoglu 's comments came after a Turkish court blocked access to websites publishing the cover of the new edition of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, which has gone on sale just a week after several of its staff were massacred in Paris.

The court, located in the southeastern province of Diyarbakir, made the ruling following a complaint about the cover, which features a weeping Prophet Mohammed holding the iconic "Je Suis Charlie" sign.

The prime minister slammed Turkey's pro-secular newspaper Cumhuriyet which published four pages of cartoons and articles in support of Charlie Hebdo - even though editors said they left out the cartoons which Muslims may find offensive.