French President Francois Hollande visited the former offices of Charlie Hebdo to unveil a commemorative plaque honouring the victims of the attack on the satirical weekly almost a year ago. A second plaque was unveiled down the street, where Muslim policeman Ahmed Merabet was killed as the two attackers fled the scene.

The Charlie Hebdo memorial plaque was later hastily covered up after authorities discovered a spelling error in the name of slain cartoonist Georges Wolinski. The black covering was then removed, and a new plaque is being prepared after the embarrassing mistake.

Charlie Hebdo
The message "I am Ahmed" is seen painted on the ground during a ceremony to unveil a commemorative plaque at the site where policeman Ahmed Merabet was killedJoel Saget/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
A commemorative plaque is seen during a ceremony at the site where policeman Ahmed Merabet was killedBenoit Tessier/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
French President Francois Hollande and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo greet the mother of Ahmed Merabet, the policeman who was killed during last year's attacks, during a ceremomy to unveil a commemorative plaque at the site in ParisBenoit Tessier/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
A painting with the message "I am Ahmed" is seen on a street after the unveiling of a commemorative plaque at the site where policeman Ahmed Merabet was killed during last January's attacksJoel Saget/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
French President Francois Hollande and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo unveil a commemorative plaque outside the former offices of French weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo during a ceremony to pay tribute to the victims of the last year's January attacks in ParisBenoit Tessier/Reuters
Charlie Hebdo
Unfortunately the name of the slain cartoonist Georges Wolinski was misspelled 'Wolinsky' on the plaque that is to be replacedBenoit Tessier/AFP
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A collage pictures Charlie Hebdo cartoonists Cabu and Wolinski as two angels inspired by a detail of The Last Judgement by Italian painter Michelangelo in the Sistine ChapelJoel Saget/AFP
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Mosaics picture Charlie Hebdo staff (top row, left to right) Honore, Wolinski and Charb; and (bottom row) Tignous and CabuJoel Saget/AFP

Hollande unveiled another plaque at the Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket on the fringes of Paris, which was the scene of a bloody hostage drama. Four lives were lost when Amedy Coulibaly – a Frenchman who declared his allegiance to Islamic State (Isis) – staged an attack. Coulibaly was an ally of gunmen Said and Cherif Kouachi who carried out the Charlie Hebdo shootings.

Charlie Hebdo
French soldiers patrol outside the Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket after France's President attended a commemorative ceremony to pay tribute to the victims of last January's terrorist attackIan Langsdon
Charlie Hebdo
A commemorative plaque is unveiled outside the Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket where four Jews – three shoppers and an employee – were killed during a horrifying hostage dramaIan Langsdon

Hollande will unveil a plaque on Saturday 9 January to police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe, who was killed in Montrouge a few days after the attacks. Extra security was on hand for these commemorations as the country remains under a state of emergency after the 13 November attacks in Paris that killed 130 people.

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7 January 2015: Armed gunmen face police officers during an attack on the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in ParisAnne Gelbard/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
7 January 2015: Firefighters carry an injured man on a stretcher in front of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris after armed gunmen stormed the officesPhilippe Dupeyrat/AFP
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8 January 2015: French police released photos of the two brothers wanted as suspects over the bloody massacre at the magazine in Paris: Cherif Kouachi, 32, and Said Kouachi, 34French Police/AFP
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9 January 2015: Smoke rises from a printing business in Dammartin-en-Goele, north-east of Paris, where two brothers suspected of slaughtering 12 people in an Islamist attack on French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo were holding one person hostage as police cornered themJoel Saget/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
9 January 2015: French police released photos of Amedy Coulibaly, 32 (left) who was wanted in connection with the shooting of a French policewoman and suspected as being involved in the hostage situation at a kosher store in the Porte de Vincennes area of Paris, and known associate Hayat Boumeddiene, 26 (right)Direction centrale de la Police judiciaire via Getty Images
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9 January 2015: Members of the French police special forces launch an assault on the Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket in Porte de Vincennes, during a hostage-taking dramaThomas Samson/AFP
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11 January 2015: Demonstrators make their way along Boulevard Voltaire in Paris during a unity rally following the terrorist attacksChristopher Furlong/Getty Images
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11 January 2015: Patrick Pelloux (right), a journalist at Charlie Hebdo, is embraced by Renald "Luz" Lucier, the only surviving cartoonist at the magazine, as they attend a mass unity rally following the Paris terrorist attacksDan Kitwood/Getty Images
Charlie Hebdo
15 January 2015: The coffin of Bernard 'Tignous' Verlhac, 57, one of Charlie Hebdo's cartoonists, is carried out of the town hall of Montreuil, near Paris, during his funeralBertrand Guay/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
15 January 2015: Amid tight security, members of the public arrive to pay their respects at the funeral of Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Bernard 'Tignous' Verlhac at Pere Lachaise Cemetery in ParisChristopher Furlong/Getty Images
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4 January 2016: A worker at a printing house near Paris holds a copy of the latest edition of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo bearing a headline which translates as "One year on: The assassin still at large" in an edition to mark the first anniversary of the terror attackMartin Bureau/AFP
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4 January 2016: People stand next to the makeshift tribute to the victims of the terror attacks, at the Place de la Republique in ParisJoel Saget/AFP
Charlie Hebdo
4 January 2016: A crying doll is seen among flowers at a makeshift memorial outside the Bataclan concert hall in Paris, ahead of the anniversary of the jihadist attack on French satirical weekly newspaper Charlie HebdoJoel Saget/AFP