temple guard Amenhotep
The tomb of temple guard Amenhotep has been discovered in Luxor.Egypt Antiquities Ministry

An ancient Egyptian tomb belonging to a man who served as temple guard to the deity Amun has been discovered in Luxor.

The tomb of Amenhotep dates to the New Kingdom's 18th Dynasty – between 1543 and 1292 BCE – and contains colourful scenes painted on plaster.

The discovery was announced by Egypt's Antiquities Ministry, which said in a statement: "A new tomb belonging to 'Amenhotep' who is also called Rebiu, the door-keeper of god Amun has been discovered by the American Research Centre's Mission with an Egyptian team of inspectors working at the area."

ancient egyptian tomb
The tomb was found near the Tomb of Djehuty - an ancient Egyptian generalEgypt Antiquities Ministry

Explaining the layout, the ministry said: "The tomb is T shaped and consists of a Transverse Hall 5.10m in length and 1.5m wide that leads to another chamber that is 2.5m long and 2.1 wide.

"There is a small unfinished niche at the eastern end. There is also an entrance in the south that leads to a small side room which is 2m by 2m. In the middle of this room there is a shaft that may lead to the burial chamber.

temple guard Amenhotep
The tomb is T shaped and contained a number of brightly coloured paintingsEgypt Antiquities Ministry

Inside the tomb, there were also "many stunning scenes" with bright colours painted on the plaster. Most scenes represented Amenhotep and his wife in front of an offering table. There is also an image of a goddess nursing a royal child and scenes of daily life.

Sultan Eid, general director of the Upper Egypt region, added the tomb had been "deliberately damaged" in ancient times. "The name and titles of the tomb owner, some hieroglyphic texts and scenes in addition to the names of the god Amun were deliberately erased," he said.

temple guard tomb
Further excavation work will be carried out to find out more about the temple guard tomb.Egypt Antiquities Ministry

The discovery was made in the courtyard of the Tomb of Djehuty (TT110), a general under the ancient Egyptian king Thutmose III. Further excavations will tell if they shared the same courtyard.