Scotland Yes sign
Furious Yes campaigners have taken to Twitter and Facebook to claim the independence referendum vote was riggedReuters

Police Scotland have confirmed that they are investigating a video posted to YouTube that claims the Scottish independence referendum was rigged in favour of the No vote.

In the video, a blogger who calls himself John Son of David claims he received an anonymous phone call telling him to collect a carrier bag that was left by a bin in Glasgow.

After finding the bag in question, John then shows the camera several ballot papers with a cross in the Yes box, which he believes is evidence of electoral fraud.

The video has been viewed more than 80,000 times since it was posted last weekend.

A Police Scotland spokesperson told IBTimes UK they had been made aware of the video and were "looking into it", though would make no further comment on the investigation at this stage.

Scottish newspaper The Herald claims it has been informed by a source close to the man in the video that the alleged ballot papers were handed in to the police, although the force refused to confirm or deny this.

The Herald notably saw a sales rise of 111% in the run up to the referendum by publicly backing the Yes campaign on its front page.

Conspiracy theories have been florid in accusing Westminster of rigging the Scotland independence vote since it was held on 18 September.

Around 100,000 people have signed a petition calling for a re-vote due to "evidence of fraud" and Yes voters took to Twitter and Facebook to voice their concerns following a number of "suspicious" photos, video clips and strange occurrences such as dual fire alarms in polling stations.

Around 1,500 people attended weekend rallies in Glasgow and Edinburgh calling for a re-run of the independence referendum.

Chief counting officer Mary Pitcaithly has responded to fresh claims of electoral fraud by saying all the counts "were properly conducted and scrutinised."