Money smuggling
A pilot from Dallas is accused of attempted money and jewelry smuggling into the US.Reuters

A Texas pilot is accused of attempting to smuggle nearly $200,000 (£138,526) in undeclared money and jewellery into the US. Anthony Warner, of Dallas, was arrested at New Jersey's Newark Liberty International Airport on 10 January after arriving as a passenger on a flight from Mumbai, India.

Newark Patch reported that the commercial airline pilot held a US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Global Entry Card. Prosecutors said Warner had been approved for the Global Entry Card programme, which "allows expedited clearance upon arrival in the United States for pre-approved travelers who have been determined to be low-risk."

When he arrived at the airport, Warner was forced to present his customs declaration to a CBP officer because the Global Entry computer system was not functioning, prosecutors said. Screening found that Warner was carrying a laptop-style bag that contained the undeclared money and jewellery.

US federal prosecutors said Warner had $196,000 (£135,654) wrapped in newspaper along with 10 rings, four sets of earrings and other jewellery. According to The Dallas Morning News, the 55-year-old was charged with bulk cash smuggling and making false statements.

Warner was released on a $100,000 bail. If convicted on both counts, he could face up to 100 years in prison. The Dallas Morning News reported that Warner is being represented by the federal public defender's office.

The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement notes that criminal organisations often smuggle cash into the country to avoid being detected by authorities. It is illegal in the US to bring in or take out more than $10,000 in currency or monetary instruments, including checks and money orders, without reporting it to the US Customs and Border Protection. Punishment for bulk cash smuggling is up to five years in prison and forfeiture of the property.