Briton Syria
A British citizen smiles in a car as he leaves a hospital after they undergo medical check up and fingerprinting in Hatay southern of Turkey on April 02, 2015. Nine British citizens, including 4 children, were detained in Turkey's southern provinces of Hatay and Gaziantep as authorities foiled their alleged attempts to enter Syria illegally.Getty Images

One of the nine Britons arrested by Turkish military, after allegedly trying to illegally cross the border into Syria, has been identified as the son of a Labour councillor.

Rochdale councillor Shakil Ahmed said he was under the assumption that his son Waheed, 22, was in Birmingham on a work placement.

Ahmed said he wants his son to return home, "as soon as possible so I can find out what's going on."

The councillor released a statement saying: "My son is a good Muslim and his loyalties belong to Britain, so I don't understand what he's doing there.

"If I thought for a second that he was in danger of being radicalised, I would have reported him to the authorities.

"He's studying a degree in politics and sociology at Manchester University and has a good future ahead of him."

Waheed was detained alongside four other adults aged 21, 22, 24 and 47, and four children aged one, three, eight and 11.

The group was stopped at a military outpost in Turkey and will be deported back to the UK soon, said police.

The Britons are believed to members of the same family from Rochdale.

Meanwhile, Greater Manchester Police and the North West Counter Terrorism force are investigating why the Britons allegedly tried to enter Syria.

"What is obviously concerning is why a family were seemingly attempting to take very young and vulnerable children into a warzone; such a volatile and dangerous environment is no place for them whatsoever," said Assistant Chief Constable Ian Wiggett.

No "evidence whatsoever" was uncovered from the group, said police who confirmed the group posed no imminent threat to the UK.

The "safety and welfare" of the children is the primary concern and a "full safeguarding strategy" is in place upon their return, said police.

"The idea you can take young children into a war zone is despicable and we condemn those adults who have done this," said Mohammed Shafiq, chief executive of the Ramadhan Foundation, reported BBC News.

An estimated 600 Britons have reportedly gone to Syria or Iraq since Islamic State (Isis) militants started seizing territories there.