The Chinese have bid adieu to the Year of the Dragon and gracefully welcomed the Year of the Snake. The Chinese New Year 2013 has been enthusiastically celebrated across the world, to mark the arrival of the Water Snake - which Chinese astrology considers powerful and associated with the notion of Karma.

Chinese nationals and believers in Chinese mythology displayed their deep attachment to the traditional values with a wonderful welcome to the New Year, no matter which part of world they were in. Spectacular celebrations filled with colours were seen in countries including Malaysia, Taiwan, Singapore, the United Kingdom, Mexico and India. Night skies were lit on Saturday with the continuous bursting of firecrackers, to bring good fortune. The celebrations continued until the early hours of Sunday morning.

Freezing temperatures and a plea from the government to restrict the use of firecrackers (in an attempt to control a growing and dangerous pollution problem) failed to have any truly significant impact.  

Chinese astrology says those born in the Year of the Snake are considered intuitive, introspective and refined, although they can be manipulative, scheming or even proud. Financially, the year is predicted to be good for Snake people but they are expected to face medical problems.

Scroll down to see spectacular photos of Chinese New Year 2013 celebrations across the world 

READ Chinese New Year 2013: Predictions for the Year of the Snake as Beijing Celebrates with Colour and Style [PHOTOS]

READ Chinese New Year 2013: Year of Snake Follows the Dragon

READ Chinese New Year 2013: Year of Water Snake Welcomed with Stunning Fireworks Display [PHOTOS]

READ China Pollution Levels: Chinese New Year 2013 Masked by Smog [SLIDESHOW]

An ethnic Chinese Malaysian woman shops for Chinese decorations ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Kuala Lumpur January 30, 2013. The Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
An ethnic Chinese Malaysian woman shops for Chinese decorations ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Kuala Lumpur January 30, 2013. The Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad
A Sentosa Island staff volunteer prepares to pose for photos after the completion of a 100m (328 feet) long sand snake sculpture, entitled Glittering Snake Trail by Singaporean sand sculptor JOOheng Tan, during a media preview of the Sentosa Flowers festival on Singapore's Sentosa Island February 4, 2013. A total of 128 staff volunteers took part to help colour the snake, which forms the Chinese character
A Sentosa Island staff volunteer prepares to pose for photos after the completion of a 100m (328 feet) long sand snake sculpture, entitled Glittering Snake Trail by Singaporean sand sculptor JOOheng Tan, during a media preview of the Sentosa Flowers festival on Singapore's Sentosa Island February 4, 2013. A total of 128 staff volunteers took part to help colour the snake, which forms the Chinese character "Fortune", with colour-dye sand. The flower festival, which will usher in the Lunar Year of the Snake, will be opened to the public on the eve of the new year on February 9.REUTERS/Edgar Su
A diver dressed as a Chinese fortune god unfurls a scroll that reads
A diver dressed as a Chinese fortune god unfurls a scroll that reads "Happy New Year" at Underwater World Singapore, ahead of the Lunar New Year, on the island of Sentosa in Singapore February 5, 2013. The Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Edgar Su
An ethnic Chinese Malaysian leaves Thean Hock Keong temple, popularly known as Snake Temple, ahead of the Chinese New Year celebrations in Klang outside Kuala Lumpur February 5, 2013. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
An ethnic Chinese Malaysian leaves Thean Hock Keong temple, popularly known as Snake Temple, ahead of the Chinese New Year celebrations in Klang outside Kuala Lumpur February 5, 2013. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad
Traditional Chinese dancers wait to perform ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Suphan Buri province, about 65.2 miles (105 km) north of Bangkok February 8, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Traditional Chinese dancers wait to perform ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Suphan Buri province, about 65.2 miles (105 km) north of Bangkok February 8, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Women buy traditional clothes ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Bangkok's Chinatown February 8, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Women buy traditional clothes ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Bangkok's Chinatown February 8, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Chinese Cambodian men and women perform a dragon dance to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the river bank in front of the Royal Palace, Phnom Penh February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Chinese Cambodian men and women perform a dragon dance to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the river bank in front of the Royal Palace, Phnom Penh February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Samrang Pring
Chinese Cambodian men perform a dragon dance to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in front of the Royal Palace, Phnom Penh February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Chinese Cambodian men perform a dragon dance to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in front of the Royal Palace, Phnom Penh February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Samrang Pring
The head of the dragon dance costume is seen as Chinese Cambodian men perform in celebration of the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in front of the Royal Palace, Phnom Penh February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
The head of the dragon dance costume is seen as Chinese Cambodian men perform in celebration of the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in front of the Royal Palace, Phnom Penh February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Samrang Pring
Security guards walk towards a snake sculpture as they gather for a security task of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth), in Beijing, February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Security guards walk towards a snake sculpture as they gather for a security task of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth), in Beijing, February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Jason Lee
Snake toys are displayed for sale at a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth), in Beijing, February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Snake toys are displayed for sale at a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth), in Beijing, February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Jason Lee
Women buy clothes ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Bangkok's Chinatown February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Women buy clothes ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Bangkok's Chinatown February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Men light up fireworks as residents celebrate the start of the Chinese New Year in Shanghai February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Men light up fireworks as residents celebrate the start of the Chinese New Year in Shanghai February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Carlos Barria
An artist performs the traditional Chinese lion dance during Lunar New Year celebrations in Chinatown in Mexico City February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
An artist performs the traditional Chinese lion dance during Lunar New Year celebrations in Chinatown in Mexico City February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Henry Romero
Artists perform the traditional Chinese lion dance during Lunar New Year celebrations in Chinatown in Mexico City February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Artists perform the traditional Chinese lion dance during Lunar New Year celebrations in Chinatown in Mexico City February 9, 2013. The Lunar New Year begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Henry Romero
Worshippers pray behind candles during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Worshippers pray behind candles during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Pichi Chuang
Worshippers pray during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Worshippers pray during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Pichi Chuang
Worshippers rest near flower offerings during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Worshippers rest near flower offerings during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Pichi Chuang
Vendors sell balloons in front of Lungshan temple during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.
Vendors sell balloons in front of Lungshan temple during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Taipei February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.REUTERS/Pichi Chuang
Members of the Chinese community light incense inside a temple as they celebrate the Lunar New Year in Kolkata February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac. Kolkata is home to India's only Chinatown in a metro city.
Members of the Chinese community light incense inside a temple as they celebrate the Lunar New Year in Kolkata February 10, 2013. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begins on February 10 and marks the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac. Kolkata is home to India's only Chinatown in a metro city.REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri