Blackberry Down Twice: Funniest Technology Blunders (PICTURES)
Failure in Motion: RIM believes that it can save itself, despite a disastrous year.

Court documents have revealed that the two Research in Motion executives whose drunken behaviour forced a flight to land last week "chewed through" restraints.

BlackBerry maker Research in Motion sacked George Campbell, 45 and Paul Alexander Wilson, 38, after they disrupted an Air Canada flight from Toronto to Beijing, forcing it to land at Vancouver.

The court documents, obtained by CBC News, state that the pair was "heavily intoxicated" and Campbell was described as "rowdy and abusive". The court also heard that one of the men "assaulted a flight attendant and threatened to punch another."

The two RIM employees were ordered to pay $72,000 in restitution and they received suspended sentences and parole for one year.

CBC News adds that "the pair seemed heavily intoxicated from the start of the flight, according to one passenger. They drank, passed out, and woke up to continue consuming alcohol and yelling at one another."

Crew members managed to handcuff the two executives with plastic restraints and tape, but they "chewed their way through the restraints," the court heard.

The documents go on to say that, during the 80-minute flight, "several flight attendants and a couple of passengers" restrained the men and a "lockdown situation" was initiated, meaning no one was allowed to leave their seats.

"The repercussions for the company as well as every single person on the plane, both financially and perhaps even emotionally, are going to be huge."

Both Air Canada and the two former RIM executives would not comment on the incident, and while RIM said their conduct did not fit with the company's "standards of business behaviour," the company refused to comment after being contacted by the International Business Times UK.

Earlier this month, Research in Motion was told that it would be unable to use the BBX name for its upcoming BlackBerry operating system, as a small technology company won the right to have a court injunction placed on the name.